Move Over Barbie, 'Frozen' Characters Are More Popular This Holiday Season : The Two-Way A National Retail Federation survey says 20 percent of parents plan to buy toys from the film Frozen for their daughters. As for boys, Legos are the most popular toy this holiday season.
NPR logo Move Over Barbie, 'Frozen' Characters Are More Popular This Holiday Season

Move Over Barbie, 'Frozen' Characters Are More Popular This Holiday Season

Disney's Frozen Castle & Ice Palace Playset is displayed at the TTPM Holiday Showcase in New York. In a recent survey, parents said they were more likely to buy Frozen toys for their daughters than any other present this holiday season. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Disney's Frozen Castle & Ice Palace Playset is displayed at the TTPM Holiday Showcase in New York. In a recent survey, parents said they were more likely to buy Frozen toys for their daughters than any other present this holiday season.

Richard Drew/AP

A new poll from the National Retail Federation has found that for the first time in 11 years, Barbie isn't the top toy for girls. An NRF survery found that 1 in 5 parents plan to buy merchandise tied to Disney's animated feature Frozen for their girls this holiday season, beating the 16.8 percent of parents who said they'd buy Barbie products for their daughters.

As for boys, Legos came out on top, with 14.2 percent of parents saying they'd buy Lego bricks for their boys. Here's the rest of the list from the National Retail Federation website:

2014 Top Toys for Boys

1. Legos

2. Cars and trucks

3. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

4. Video games

5. Hot Wheels

6. Xbox One

7. PlayStation 4

8. Transformers

9. Remote-controlled vehicles

10. (tie) Marvel action figures

10. (tie) Tablet/Apple iPad

2014 Top Toys for Girls

1. Disney's Frozen

2. Barbie

3. Other dolls

4. Monster High dolls

5. American Girl dolls

6. Legos

7. Tablet/Apple iPad

8. My Little Pony

9. Disney's Doc McStuffins

10. Clothing

This news is good for the Barbie brand, which faced a backlash earlier this month over a 2010 Barbie book called "Barbie: I Can Be A Computer Engineer," in which Barbie needs help from men to actually use her computer. Mattel apologized for the book, saying "the portrayal of Barbie in this specific story doesn't reflect the Brand's vision for what Barbie stands for."

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