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Weather

A house is seen burning in September 2020 in the Zogg Fire near Ono, Calif. Pacific Gas & Electric was charged with manslaughter and other crimes on Friday in the Northern California wildfire last year that killed four people and destroyed hundreds of homes. Ethan Swope/AP hide caption

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Ethan Swope/AP

Hurricane Sam has not triggered any storm warnings or watches, but forecasters are keeping a close eye on the storm, with it predicted to reach major hurricane status on Saturday. NOAA/Esri/HERE/Garmin/Earthstar Geographics hide caption

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NOAA/Esri/HERE/Garmin/Earthstar Geographics

As inspiration for all trees preparing their autumnal hues, here's a beautiful red oak photographed in Berlin's Kreuzberg district on October 28, 2020. DAVID GANNON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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DAVID GANNON/AFP via Getty Images

Wilma Banks, who lives in the neighborhood of New Orleans East, sits on her bed next to her nebulizer and CPAP machine. In the aftermath of Hurricane Ida, when much of New Orleans was left without power, she wasn't able to power up the medical devices and had only her limited supply of inhalers to widen her airways. Kathleen Flynn for ProPublica hide caption

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Kathleen Flynn for ProPublica

Entergy Resisted Upgrading New Orleans' Power Grid. Residents Paid The Price

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A patchwork of national and state regulations require utilities to trim around their power lines. More than a dozen of the country's largest utilities told NPR that falling trees and branches represent a leading cause of outages. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Climate Change Is Killing Trees And Causing Power Outages

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Bags of garbage pile up on a New Orleans street on Friday. Trash collection delays have left some residents outraged at the city's contractors. Kevin McGill/AP hide caption

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Kevin McGill/AP

Listen to Nelsen's reporting on Morning Edition

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The city of Austin, Texas, has installed cameras that let residents see rising floodwaters at key intersections. It also has online maps of flooded areas, which TV newscasts sometimes show. Eddie Gaspar/KUT hide caption

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Eddie Gaspar/KUT

Texas Offers 4 Lessons For Staying Safe In Flash Floods

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Teenagers move barrels of rainwater they collected from Tropical Storm Nicholas, in the aftermath of Hurricane Ida in Pointe-aux-Chenes, La., on Tuesday. They have had no running water since the hurricane, and collected 140 gallons of rainwater in two hours from the tropical storm, which they filter and pump into their house for showers. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Commuters walk into a flooded subway station and disrupted service due to extremely heavy rainfall from the remnants of Hurricane Ida on September 2, 2021. David Dee Delgado/Getty Images hide caption

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David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Climate Change Means More Subway Floods; How Cities Are Adapting

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The city of Galliano, La. is still recovering after Hurricane Ida ripped through the southeastern part of the state on August 29. In addition to the destruction, more than 100,000 homes and businesses are still without power. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Two Weeks After Hurricane Ida, Tens Of Thousands in Louisiana Are Still Without Power

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Celbing Diaz fishes ahead of Tropical Storm Nicholas in Galveston, Texas, on Monday. The storm grew overnight and made landfall as a hurricane early Tuesday. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

A webcam still showing blizzard conditions at Summit Station, a weather research station at Greenland's highest point. In August, the station recorded rain for the first time ever. Arctic Research Support and Logistics Services / National Science Foundation hide caption

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Arctic Research Support and Logistics Services / National Science Foundation

Peter Hemans spent the night at New Jersey's Hackensack Middle School, where he is the head custodian, to make sure emergency sump pumps were working properly. Principal Dr. A. Galiana hide caption

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Principal Dr. A. Galiana

Crews set a backfire in an effort to gain control of the massive Caldor fire near the Tahoe basin in California on Aug. 26. Ty O'Neil/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images hide caption

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Ty O'Neil/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images

Pope Francis, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Portal Welby and Archbishop of Constantinople and Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew, shown at a meeting of prayer in the Basilica of St. Francis in 2016, are asking for climate action. Vatican pool photo/Getty Images hide caption

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Vatican pool photo/Getty Images

Upper Little Caillou Elementary School in Terrebonne Parish, La., saw significant storm damage from Hurricane Ida almost two weeks ago. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

More Than 45,000 Louisiana Students Could Be Out Of School Until October Due To Ida

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