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Weather

Firefighters douse the destroyed Jagger Library at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. A wildfire raging on the slopes of Cape Town's Table Mountain spread to the university, forcing the evacuation of students. Nardus Engelbrecht/AP hide caption

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Nardus Engelbrecht/AP

A Coast Guard Station Grand Isle boat crew heads toward a capsized commercial lift boat on Tuesday, searching for people in the water 8 miles south of Grand Isle, La. U.S. Coast Guard District 8 hide caption

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U.S. Coast Guard District 8

A pedestrian using an umbrella to get some relief from the sun walks past a sign displaying the temperature on June 20, 2017, in Phoenix. Ralph Freso/Getty Images hide caption

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Ralph Freso/Getty Images

Your Weather Forecast Update: Warmer Climate Will Be The New 'Normal'

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Lightning strikes on August 5, 2005 southwest of Barstow, California David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Fulgurite: What A Lightning-Formed Rock May Have Contributed To Life On Earth

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A car that was carried by floodwaters leans against a tree in a creek in Nashville, Tenn., on Sunday. Heavy rainfall flooded roads, submerged vehicles and left many people in need of rescue. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

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Mark Humphrey/AP

People wait in line to fill propane tanks on Feb. 17 in Houston. Power grid problems left millions weathering conditions in the dark in uninsulated homes, intensifying the Texas winter storm's deadliness. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

This combination of satellite images provided by the National Hurricane Center shows the 30 named storms that developed during the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season. National Hurricane Center via AP hide caption

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National Hurricane Center via AP

The 2021 Hurricane Season Won't Use Greek Letters For Storms

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Lava flows Saturday from the Fagradalsfjall volcano on Iceland's Reykjanes Peninsula. The long-dormant volcano erupted Friday evening. Icelandic Coast Guard/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Icelandic Coast Guard/AFP via Getty Images

People cross the road as a sign warns of heavy snow on Sunday in Denver. A winter storm closed roads, affected flights and knocked out power in Arizona, Wyoming, Nebraska and Colorado through the weekend. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

Kathy Gomez shovels her sidewalk on Sunday in Denver. Around 2,000 flights in and out of Denver have been canceled this weekend and highways around the state have been closed down as a winter storm pummels Colorado and neighboring states. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

The South Padre Island Convention Center opened its doors and took in thousands of sea turtles cold-stunned during the Valentine's Week Winter Storm. UT Marine Science Institute hide caption

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UT Marine Science Institute

Texas 'Cold-Stun' Of 2021 Was Largest Sea Turtle Rescue In History, Scientists Say

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A road is flooded near the breached Kaupakalua Dam in the Haiku area of the Hawaiian island of Maui on Monday. Maggie T. Sutrov via Reuters hide caption

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Maggie T. Sutrov via Reuters

In early September 2020, Seattle, Wash., had some of the worst air quality in the world because of wildfire smoke. The city was among the first to create smoke shelters for the most vulnerable. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nathan Rott/NPR

Bill Magness, President and CEO of the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), testifies on Thursday as the Committees on State Affairs and Energy Resources hold a joint public hearing to consider the factors that led to statewide electrical blackouts. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Water for flushing toilets was being distributed at seven sites in Mississippi's capital city — more than 10 days after winter storms wreaked havoc on the city's water system because the system is still struggling to maintain consistent water pressure, authorities said. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

A windfarm near Velva, North Dakota. Two counties in the state have enacted drastic restrictions on new wind projects in an attempt to save coal mining jobs, despite protests from landowners who'd like to rent their land to wind energy companies. Karen Bleier/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP via Getty Images

North Dakota Officials Block Wind Power In Effort To Save Coal

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