Latin Roots: Essential Ranchera : World Cafe Ranchera, a sort of Mexican country music, began as a way to comment on the tastes of the rich.
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Latin Roots: Essential Ranchera

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Latin Roots: Essential Ranchera

Latin Roots: Essential Ranchera

Latin Roots: Essential Ranchera

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Antonio Aguilar in The Undefeated. Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Antonio Aguilar in The Undefeated.

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Playlist

  • José Alfredo Jiménez, "El Rey"
  • Lucha Villa, "Yo Me Muero Donde Quiera"
  • Antonio Aguilar, "Canción Mixteca"

Rachel Faro joins World Cafe's Latin Roots to talk ranchera. Sometimes called "Mexican country music," ranchera, Faro says, is a serenade style that began as a protest against the tastes of the rich during the Mexican revolution. In fact, the work of composer José Alfredo Jiménez sometimes resembles U.S. folk music — a form of protest music in its own right.

"[Ranchera is] all about feeling," Faro says. "It's really the heart and soul of Mexico in many ways. ... [It] is a way for the people to express themselves: their lives, their feelings, their hopes and dreams."

Hear the full episode at the audio link and more ranchera music at an extended Spotify playlist.

Episode Playlist