Rachael Yamagata On World Cafe : World Cafe The singer-songwriter's latest work has an optimistic, outward-facing spirit inspired by her new front porch in Woodstock, N.Y.
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Rachel Yamagata On World Cafe

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Rachael Yamagata On World Cafe

Rachael Yamagata On World Cafe

Rachel Yamagata On World Cafe

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Rachel Yamagata's newest album is called Tightrope Walker. Laura Crosta/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Laura Crosta/Courtesy of the artist

Rachel Yamagata's newest album is called Tightrope Walker.

Laura Crosta/Courtesy of the artist

Set List

  • "Break Apart"
  • "Let Me Be Your Girl"
  • "Black Sheep"
  • "Over"

There has almost always been a certain amount of heartbreak in Rachael Yamagata's music. But on her new album, Tightrope Walker, she's made room for a corresponding amount of optimism. Yamagata uses these songs' birthplace — the front porch of her new house in Woodstock, N.Y. — as a metaphor for the songs' outward focus. She is now writing songs not so much to soothe her own aching heart, but to help other people.

The piano-playing singer got her start with a very different kind of music, fronting the Chicago R&B band Bumpus. Since her first solo EP in 2002, she's released four albums and several more EPs. In this session, we talk about her connection with Woodstock, where her parents lived for years, and how getting older has changed her art.

Episode Playlist