David Dye's Top 10 Albums Of 2016 : World Cafe These are the albums that the longtime World Cafe host turned to the most this year. Some may surprise you.
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David Dye's Top 10 Albums Of 2016

Sturgill Simpson's album A Sailor's Guide To Earth is one of David Dye's top 10 albums of 2016. Reto Sterchi/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Reto Sterchi/Courtesy of the artist

Sturgill Simpson's album A Sailor's Guide To Earth is one of David Dye's top 10 albums of 2016.

Reto Sterchi/Courtesy of the artist

These are the albums I found myself turning to the most this year. Some of them are reflected in the typical music we program every day on World Cafe. Some, not so much.

David Dye's Top 10 Albums Of 2016

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Teens Of Denial

  • by Car Seat Headrest

Will Toledo's Car Seat Headrest album is my top guitar-rock album of the year. That's definitely not a category in ascension — this year, we saw a lot of creativity concentrated in pop, R&B and hip-hop instead. But Toledo's tales of post-college perplexity transcend rock — and the millennial generation.

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Sturgill Simpson, 'A Sailor's Guide To Earth' Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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A Sailor's Guide To Earth

  • by Sturgill Simpson

This, too, is an album that transcends its genre; here, that's country music. Though Sturgill Simpson's record examines a different stage of life from Will Toledo's — Simpson sings as a father offering advice to his newborn son — the emotions run just as deep. The fact that this has ended up with a Grammy nomination for Album of the Year is gratifying.

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Heart Like A Levee

  • by Hiss Golden Messenger

I was a little surprised by the lack of attention this Hiss Golden Messenger record got this year. This album, which examines the pull of the road versus the comforts of home, features some of M.C. Taylor's most poetic writing yet.

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Blackstar

  • by David Bowie

The year started with this magnificent album and the sad news of David Bowie's passing. Blackstar, as creative a work as Bowie had ever produced, has held our attention ever since.

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Light Upon The Lake

  • by Whitney

From Smith Westerns' Max Kakacek and Unknown Mortal Orchestral's Julien Ehrlich, who together go by the name Whitney, comes the most buoyant album of sad songs of the year. Light Upon The Lake has just continued to grow on me since it came out. It's another good argument for guitar pop in 2016.

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Black Terry Cat

  • by Xenia Rubinos.

After Xenia Rubinos' World Cafe performance, I returned to Black Terry Cat and realized how fantastic an album it is. This has been a great year for compelling records by powerful women (see also: Solange's A Seat At The Table), and I'm especially impressed by the way Rubinos combines so many styles into a singular whole.

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Shine On Rainy Day

  • by Brent Cobb

This is one softly understated collection of country songs from a guy who makes a living writing for more commercial country artists. The front-porch feel and the ease of Brent Cobb's playing make for a simple and beautiful album.

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American Band

  • by Drive-By Truckers

Drive-By Truckers' Patterson Hood and Mike Cooley have always written about the South, often taking their home to task. This year, they doubled down with this highly political album. Songs like "What It Means" express the Truckers' willingness to combat ignorance and prejudice.

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Stranger To Stranger

  • by Paul Simon

Like Bowie and Leonard Cohen, Paul Simon proved that older musicians are still making relevant art in 2016. With humor and rhythm, Simon entertains both himself and us.

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Malibu

  • by Anderson .Paak

After his strong contributions to Dr. Dre's Compton in 2015, many people were waiting for Anderson .Paak's Malibu early this year. It's such a stylistically broad and satisfying record, with many producers and guest artists united by .Paak's smooth, old-school vocals.

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