Feist On Drawing 'Pleasure' Out Of Pain : World Cafe The Canadian indie-pop singer-songwriter and guitarist set out to make her latest record alone, but says she ended up experiencing a whole lot of togetherness.
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Feist On World Cafe

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Feist On World Cafe

Feist On World Cafe

Feist On World Cafe

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Feist's latest album is called Pleasure. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Feist's latest album is called Pleasure.

Courtesy of the artist

Playlist

  • "How Come You Never Go There" (studio version from Metals)
  • "Pleasure" (studio version from Pleasure)
  • "Get Not High, Get Not Low" (studio version from Pleasure)
  • "Any Party" (studio version from Pleasure)

Leslie Feist's latest album, Pleasure, is gritty, defiant and intimate in a way that's different from anything else we've heard from her. And when she wrote it, she was having a hard time feeling — well, pleasure. She explains in this session that she chose that word as a way to try and talk herself out of the dark feelings at the other extreme.

Feist set out to make Pleasure alone, but in the process of creating it, she ended up experiencing a whole lot of togetherness. We'll talk about how that transpired and about everything that's happened to her, creatively and personally, in the six years since her last release, 2011's Polaris Prize winning album Metals. Hear the complete session in the player above.

Episode Playlist