Hatchie On World Cafe : World Cafe Harriette Pilbeam talks about striking out as a solo artist and capturing the sparkling sounds of 90s pop on her debut EP, Sugar & Spice.
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Hatchie On World Cafe

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Hatchie On World Cafe

Hatchie On World Cafe

Hatchie On World Cafe

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/670804669/670812846" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
VuHaus

Set List

  • "Sure"
  • "Sugar & Spice"
  • "Sleep"

So much of the music of the last few years has been influenced by the sounds of the 1980's. The revolutionary (and affordable) gear made it's way into musicians hands and people continue to go back to those sounds and textures. However, for this generation of young adults making music, there's another decade to explore ripe with it's own stylistic quirks — the 1990's. Hatchie is one of those artists.

Harriette Pilbeam grew up in Australia with the family nickname Hatchie and she's been playing in various bands since she was a teenager. That's why people took notice when she released "Try," her debut single, in May 2017. Nearly a year later, Hatchie dropped her debut EP, Sugar & Spice, capturing some of the sparkling dream-pop sounds of a decade near and dear to my heart.

In this session, I talk to Harriette about what it was like to go out as a solo artist and hear a live performance from the musician and her band.

Episode Playlist