U.S. Girls On 'Heavy Light' And Recruiting Bruce Springsteen's Bandmate : World Cafe Over time, the sound and lineup of U.S. Girls has evolved from just Meg Remy. On the group's latest record, Heavy Light, up to 20 musicians recorded in the studio at the same time.
NPR logo

U.S. Girls on World Cafe

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/880169786/880335990" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
U.S. Girls' Meg Remy Turns 'Less Is More' Upside Down

U.S. Girls' Meg Remy Turns 'Less Is More' Upside Down

U.S. Girls on World Cafe

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/880169786/880335990" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

U.S. Girls Colin Medley/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Colin Medley/Courtesy of the artist

U.S. Girls

Colin Medley/Courtesy of the artist

Set List

  • "IOU"
  • "4 American Dollars"
  • "Overtime"

Meg Remy's musical roots are in the DIY punk world, and when she first started making music as U.S. Girls more than a decade ago, she played everything herself. But over time, the sound and lineup of evolved. The new U.S. Girls album, Heavy Light, features up to 20 musicians recording in the studio at the same time.

In this session, we talk about turning the idiom "less is more" upside down. Hear the story of how Meg recruited saxophonist Jake Clemons from Bruce Springsteen's band to play on the new record, and hear full band performances that U.S. Girls recorded before the pandemic.

Episode Playlist