World Story of the Day NPR's top daily news about world events, politics, economy and culture. Download the World Story of the Day podcast.

World Story of the Day

Logging in the recently liberated areas West of Izium is dangerous and punishable by fines. Unexploded ordnance litters the ground. But some loggers take the risk for the opportunity to harvest and deliver the wood to people who need heat. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Claire Harbage/NPR

How Russia is weaponizing the Ukrainian winter

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1137698269/1138179844" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Marek Magierowski (right), the Polish ambassador to the U.S., speaks with Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep at the Polish Embassy in Washington, D.C., on Thursday. H.J. Mai/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
H.J. Mai/NPR

Polish ambassador warns of a prolonged war in Ukraine, calls for more support

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1154182329/1154385550" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The first full moon of 2023 rises behind the 15 July Martyrs bridge in Istanbul, Turkey. Emrah Gurel/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Emrah Gurel/AP

Stargazers, here are the most exciting celestial events for 2023

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1148523089/1148559235" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

NPR's Steve Inskeep interviews U.S. President Joe Biden's national security adviser Jake Sullivan in Washington, D.C. on Jan. 5, 2023. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Catie Dull/NPR

Biden's national security adviser is hopeful war over Taiwan can be prevented

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1147113733/1147345963" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Indian journalist Rana Ayyub speaks during the launch of her self published book 'Gujarat Files' in New Delhi in May 2016. On March 29, 2022, Ayyub was prevented from flying to Europe to speak about online violence on female journalists. Hindustan Times via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Hindustan Times via Getty Images

Rana Ayyub fights for press freedom in India despite harassment and death threats

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1146590204/1146590265" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Mohsen Lihidheb stands in the backyard of his museum that is filled with things that he's collected after the waves brought them ashore in Zarzis, Tunisia. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Claire Harbage/NPR

A Tunisian artist is hoping to keep the memories of migrants alive

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1142797756/1144083031" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Wasseem Jday, 31, is unemployed and splits his time between his sister's home and his parents'. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Claire Harbage/NPR

Tunisians are voting in an election critics say could cement a return to autocracy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1142517505/1143416709" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Israel's Likud Party leader Benjamin Netanyahu speaks in Jerusalem on Nov. 13 after being assigned the task of forming a government. Maya Alleruzzo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Maya Alleruzzo/AP

'They are joining me. I'm not joining them': Netanyahu defends far-right allies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1142813395/1143002594" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Fishermen in Zarzis, Tunisia, sometimes find bodies of people who have tried to cross the Mediterranean Sea to find better opportunities abroad. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Claire Harbage/NPR

Why Tunisians are now risking their lives trying to cross the Mediterranean to Europe

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1142418932/1142418933" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Anish Adhikari, now 26, worked construction jobs in Qatar for 33 months in the lead-up to the World Cup. In this 2021 photo, he poses inside the new Lusail stadium, which he helped build and which will host the World Cup final on Dec. 18. Adhikari says the Nepali agent who got him the job misled him about working conditions in Qatar: "They sell a dream that's not reality." Anish Adhikari hide caption

toggle caption
Anish Adhikari

Death and dishonesty: Stories of two workers who built the World Cup stadiums in Qatar

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1140260086/1140260087" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Fans arrive to the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil round of 16 match between Brazil and Chile at Estadio Mineirão in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, on June 28, 2014. Pedro Vilela/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pedro Vilela/Getty Images

Why some Brazilians won't be wearing their national soccer colors for the World Cup

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1138956878/1139147103" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mamadou Niang at his home in Gandiol, Senegal, on Oct. 6. Mamadou's father worked their family farmland until he died in 2006, and Mamadou would have liked to follow in his footsteps. But he can't, he says, because rising seas are pushing salt water into the fields. Ricci Shryock for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ricci Shryock for NPR

He has attempted the journey to Europe three times, and refuses to give up

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1134821307/1136423470" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A mine railway operator in Eastern Ukraine waits as workers disembark. Russia's invasion of Ukraine disrupted global supplies of fossil fuels and led to more reliance on coal for electricity in some countries. The future sources of energy around the world are major topics at climate negotiations underway in Egypt starting this week. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Claire Harbage/NPR

FAQ: What's at stake at the COP27 global climate negotiations

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1132796190/1134713737" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man watches a television screen showing a news broadcast with file footage of a North Korean missile test, at a railway station in Seoul on October 4, 2022. JUNG YEON-JE/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
JUNG YEON-JE/AFP via Getty Images

North Korea fires a ballistic missile over Japan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1126660435/1126686114" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

the Imvanex vaccine, used against monkeypox and often referred to as JYNNEOS, is manufactured by only one company: Denmark-based Bavarian Nordic. Global supplies are limited. Africa, where the current outbreak began, is shut out. Alain Jocard/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alain Jocard/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Is there enough monkeypox vaccine to go around? Maybe yes, more likely no

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1117658734/1117658735" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Bill Clinton holds up his hands indicating no more questions as he and Chinese President Jiang Zemin hold a joint press conference in 1997 in Washington, D.C. Clinton confirmed that he agreed to lift a ban on the export of nuclear power technology to China. Joyce Naltchayan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joyce Naltchayan/AFP via Getty Images

What 3 past Taiwan Strait crises can teach us about U.S.-China tensions today

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1115234980/1115347224" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Updates from Vinnitsyia, Ukraine after a deadly rocket attack

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1111658510/1111658511" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Russian Black Sea naval headquarters at Sevastopol, Crimea, in 2008. In the background on the right is a Russian destroyer. The Russian tall ship Padalla (with white sails) is in the center. In the foreground is the Monument to Scuttled Ships, marking Russia's intentional destruction of its own naval fleet in the Crimean War in 1854 as British and French warships approached. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

How Russia's current war in Ukraine echoes its Crimean War of the 1850s

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1106123496/1111244843" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Russian President Vladimir Putin meets with the head of Russia's Federal Financial Monitoring Service, Yury Chikhanchin, at the Kremlin in Moscow on Monday. Mikhail Metzel/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mikhail Metzel/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP

What's happening with Russia's 1st default on foreign debt in a century

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1107750231/1107750232" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In this image taken from video from Bakhtar State News Agency, Taliban fighters secure a government helicopter to evacuate injured people in Gayan district, Paktika province, Afghanistan, Wednesday, June 22, 2022. Bakhtar State News Agency via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Bakhtar State News Agency via AP

More than 900 people have reportedly been killed in an earthquake in Afghanistan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1106657719/1106662411" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A flight scheduled to take asylum-seekers, regardless of their nationality, to Rwanda awaits its passengers Tuesday at Boscombe Down Air Base, 80 miles east of London. The flight was halted by a court injunction. Finnbarr Webster/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Finnbarr Webster/Getty Images

Sending asylum-seekers from Britain to Rwanda is human trafficking, an advocate says

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1104881747/1104881748" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A view shows the Azovstal steel plant in the city of Mariupol on May 10. Hundreds of Ukrainian soldiers have been evacuated to Russian-controlled territory. Stringer/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stringer/AFP via Getty Images

Hundreds of Ukrainian soldiers evacuated from steel plant to Russian-held territory

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099369421/1099411771" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript