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Pigeons fly into the air as Muslims offer prayers at the start of the Eid al-Fitr holiday, which marks the end of Ramadan, at the Shah-e Do Shamshira Mosque in Kabul on Friday. This Eid, Afghans welcomed the start of the Taliban's first cease-fire since the 2001 U.S. invasion Noorullah Shirzada/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noorullah Shirzada/AFP/Getty Images

A column of Yemeni pro-government forces, travels Wednesday about five miles south of Hodeidah international airport. Backed by the Saudi-led coalition, the fighters launched an offensive to retake the rebel-held Red Sea port city. Nabil Hassan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nabil Hassan/AFP/Getty Images

Jes Petersen, CEO of Phandeeyar, a Yangon-based tech hub, speaks to visiting U.S. government officials and civil society activists. Phandeeyar is one of several groups that have pressed Facebook to moderate its Burmese-language content to prevent hate speech. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

Abortion rights activists celebrate Thurdsay outside the Argentine Congress in Buenos Aires, shortly after lawmakers in the country's lower chamber passed a bill legalizing abortion. The bill's chances look uncertain in the upper chamber, but that did little to dampen excitement among its supporters. Eeitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eeitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images

Chile's National Prosecutor Jorge Abbott, center, leaves the Apostolic Nunciature after meeting with Archbishop Charles Scicluna in Santiago, Chile. Police raided Roman Catholic Church offices in two Chilean cities Wednesday looking for files related to a long-running sex abuse scandal. Esteban Felix/AP hide caption

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Esteban Felix/AP

President Trump gestures to reporters as he meets with North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un at the start of the U.S.-North Korea summit in Singapore on Tuesday. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Ivanka Trump's quote of a Chinese proverb — "Those who say it can not be done, should not interrupt those doing it." — prompted a search for the original source. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Yemeni fighters loyal to the government carry explosives and land mines believed to have been planted by Houthis on June 8 near Hudaydah. Nabil Hassan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nabil Hassan/AFP/Getty Images

"I think he wants to get it done. I really feel that very strongly," President Trump says of the pledge by North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un to end a decades-old nuclear stand-off. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump participates in a working luncheon hosted by Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong in Singapore on Monday. Officials from both delegations also attended the luncheon. Photo by Ministry of Communications and Information, Republic of Singapore / Handout/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo by Ministry of Communications and Information, Republic of Singapore / Handout/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

In this handout provided by Ministry of Communications and Information of Singapore, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un arrives in Singapore on June 10, 2018. Terence Tan /Singapore Ministry of Communications and Information via Getty Images hide caption

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Terence Tan /Singapore Ministry of Communications and Information via Getty Images

Trump And Kim Eager To Declare Success In Singapore 'No Matter What Happens'

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North Korean leader Kim Jong Il and Secretary of State Madeleine Albright met in Pyongyang on Oct. 23, 2000. Tong Kim (between Albright and Kim) served as the State Department interpreter. Reuters hide caption

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Reuters

The Pressures Of Being An Interpreter At A High-Stakes Summit

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A residential building in Dandong, a city near China's northeast border with North Korea. Local authorities have tried to curb speculation in the property market. Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images

Real Estate Jumps In Chinese City Bordering North Korea

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David Douglas Duncan looking through camera fitted with prismatic lens. Duncan, who died Thursday in the south of France at age 102, was one of the greatest photojournalists of the 20th century. Sheila Duncan/Courtesy of Harry Ransom Center hide caption

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Sheila Duncan/Courtesy of Harry Ransom Center

South Koreans protest against the April 27 inter-Korean summit, when North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean President Moon Jae-in met at the border. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Will Trump Raise North Korea's Human Rights Abuses At Summit With Kim Jong Un?

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Alternative for Germany leaders Alexander Gauland and Alice Weidel listen to German Chancellor Angela Merkel answer questions at Germany's parliament on June 6. Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images

Hussam Allahham, a refugee from Syria who is trained as a doctor, now works part-time for a refugee aid organization in Wales. He says Syrians can be shocked when they reach small villages, and he tells them to consider it a break after years of struggle to survive. Daniella Cheslow/NPR hide caption

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Daniella Cheslow/NPR

'Your Children Are Safe': A Town In Wales Welcomes Refugees From Syria

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