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People withdraw money from a bank machine in the Iranian capital Tehran's Grand Bazaar in November, months after President Trump announced in May he was withdrawing from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal and reimposing sanctions on the country. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

The German government has agreed to make a one-time payment to Kindertransport survivors, commemorated by a statue in Berlin, Germany. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP

Sale Tambaya, a cattle herder in central Nigeria, grazes his cows. After his home state criminalized open grazing in November 2017, he and his family fled with their livestock to a neighboring state where grazing is allowed. Two of his sons died on the journey. Tim McDonnell for NPR hide caption

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Tim McDonnell for NPR

Ranil Wickremesinghe, seen behind the lectern, speaks to his supporters at the prime minister's official residence Sunday in Colombo. His reinstatement as prime minister concludes weeks of political chaos prompted by his firing. Ishara S. Kodikara/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ishara S. Kodikara/AFP/Getty Images

Angela Ponce, Miss Spain (center), is the first transgender contestant to compete for Miss Universe. She and other contestants are seen visiting the Government House in Bangkok last week. Narong Sangnak/AP hide caption

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Narong Sangnak/AP

The Goldman Sachs headquarters in Manhattan, as shown on Dec. 17. Malaysia has filed criminal charges against Goldman Sachs and two of its former executives on Monday over their alleged role in the ransacking of a multibillion-dollar state investment fund. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Sher Mohammad Abbas Stanakzai, a representative of the Taliban, attends international talks in Moscow last month. On Monday, the Islamist militant group announced that its representatives would be having conversations with the U.S. in the United Arab Emirates. Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (left) talks with King Salman bin Abdul-Aziz Al Saud during the Gulf Cooperation Council summit in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on Dec. 9. Courtesy of Saudi Royal Court/Reuters hide caption

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Courtesy of Saudi Royal Court/Reuters

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán shakes hands with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in July during a joint press conference in Jerusalem. Debbie Hill/AP hide caption

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Debbie Hill/AP

Abdullatif Al-Humaym, the head of Sunni Muslim endowments in all of Iraq, places the cornerstone for the rebuilding of the Great Mosque of Al-Nuri in Mosul. The historic mosque and its leaning minaret were destroyed in 2017 when Iraqi forces reclaimed the city from the Islamic State. Zaid al-Obeidi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Zaid al-Obeidi/AFP/Getty Images

Nuns and supporters demand the arrest of Bishop Franco Mulakkal, outside the High Court in Kochi in the southern Indian state of Kerala in September. -/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Nun In India Accuses A Bishop Of Rape, And Divides The Country's Christians

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The arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou, followed by China's detention of two Canadians, escalated trade and security tensions that are now leading to travel jitters. Jason Lee/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S., Canadian Executives Privately 'Spooked' About Traveling To China

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Demonstrators protesting against recent legislative measures introduced by the government of Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán stand outside parliament on Dec. 16, 2018 in Budapest, Hungary. Laszlo Balogh/Getty Images hide caption

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Laszlo Balogh/Getty Images

Protests Grip Hungary In Response To Overtime Measure That Critics Call A 'Slave Law'

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