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Russian soldiers left graffiti in the school in Borodyanka, a town outside of Ukraine's capital Kyiv. Anya Kamenetz/NPR hide caption

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Anya Kamenetz/NPR

How a Ukrainian teacher helped students escape Russia's invasion, and still graduate

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Raise Grigorievna Dreama's daughters Malina (left) and Ramina (center) and her granddaughter Monica (right) sit in their room at a temporary Chisinau housing center for refugees, mostly hosting people from the Roma community and other minority groups from Ukraine, in April. Betsy Joles hide caption

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Betsy Joles

Marcela Hernández, director of the Alma Llanera Academy, in 2022. "I admire my mom because, since she was a little girl, she has been alone and went to dance classes, she studied, graduated, studied journalism and now she has gone to several countries, many people know her and admire her very much," her daughter, Mariangel Tumay, said about about her. Juanita Escobar hide caption

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Juanita Escobar

The Chinese flag is visible behind razor wire at a housing compound in Yangisar, south of Kashgar, in China's western Xinjiang region. GREG BAKER/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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GREG BAKER/AFP via Getty Images

How goods made with forced labor end up in your local American store

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Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a Security Council meeting via a video link at the Novo-Ogaryovo state residence outside Moscow on May 20, 2022. SPUTNIK/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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SPUTNIK/AFP via Getty Images

How A Possible NATO Expansion Shows Russia's Plans are Backfiring

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Russian-backed Donetsk militia fighters man "Gvozdika" (Carnation) self-propelled artillery vehicles to fire toward a Ukrainian army position outside Donetsk, in territory held by the separatist Donetsk government in eastern Ukraine, Friday. Fighting has intensified in the Donbas region this week. Alexei Alexandrov/AP hide caption

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Alexei Alexandrov/AP

An aerial photo taken in April 2020 shows the scenery of a giant karst sinkhole in China's Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. A similar sinkhole was found earlier this month with an ancient forest at the bottom with trees towering over 100 feet tall. Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

Marcus Kuilan-Nazario's "Macho Stereo" is an homage to his late father, an audiophile. He says his father used to record on this reel-to-reel player. Mandalit del Barco/NPR News hide caption

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Mandalit del Barco/NPR News

Spoken word and sonic rituals: East LA exhibit features Latinx artists using sound

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Basira Joya, 20, a news presenter, sits during recording at the Zan TV station (women's TV) in Kabul, Afghanistan, on May 30, 2017. Afghanistan's Taliban rulers ordered all female TV presenters to cover their faces on air, the country's biggest media outlet said on Thursday. Rahmat Gul/AP hide caption

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Rahmat Gul/AP

Martial law victims including former lawmaker Satur Ocampo (third from left) and their lawyers headed by Howard Calleja (second from left), show documents after filing a petition with the supreme Court in Manila on Wednesday seeking the disqualification of presumptive president Ferdinand Marcos Jr. Ted Aljibe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ted Aljibe/AFP via Getty Images

Joe Biden listens to remarks by Finland's President Sauli Niinisto and Sweden's Prime Minister Magdalena Andersson at the White House this week. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Two versions of history collide as Finland and Sweden seek to join NATO

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Ukrainian servicemen from the Azovstal steel plant sit on a bus near a penal colony, in Olyonivka, in territory under the government of the Donetsk People's Republic, on Friday. AP hide caption

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AP

Russia aims to capitalize on controlling the Ukrainian port city of Mariupol

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Rahima Banu, pictured with her mother in Bangladesh in 1975, is recorded as having the last known naturally-occurring case of the deadly form of smallpox. Daniel Tarantola/WHO hide caption

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Daniel Tarantola/WHO

How Rahima came to hold a special place in smallpox history — and help ensure its end

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Ukrainians wait in a miles-long jam full of trucks, buses and cars to cross to the border at Medyka, Poland. Adam Lach for NPR hide caption

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Adam Lach for NPR

Millions rushed to leave Ukraine. Now the queue to return home stretches for miles

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A student monk representing Inter University Students Federation shouts slogans during an anti government protest in Colombo, Sri Lanka, Thursday, May 19, 2022. Sri Lankans have been protesting for more than a month demanding the resignation of President Gotabaya Rajapaksa, holding him responsible for the country's worst economic crisis in recent memory. Eranga Jayawardena/AP hide caption

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Eranga Jayawardena/AP

A woman wearing a face mask walks past a Huawei store temporarily closed due to coronavirus-related restrictions in Beijing, Thursday, May 12, 2022. China's leaders are struggling to reverse a deepening economic slump while keeping a "zero-COVID" strategy that has shut down Shanghai and other cities. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Students listen to a teacher during a lesson at Poland's Warsaw Ukrainian School, on Wednesday, May 11, 2022. Adam Lach for NPR hide caption

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Adam Lach for NPR

They Fled The Most Traumatized Parts of Ukraine. Classrooms Are Offering Them Hope

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