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A street in Dingle, Ireland. Teri Schultz for NPR hide caption

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Teri Schultz for NPR

Ireland Finds U.S. Tourists During Pandemic May Be Trouble. But So Is Their Absence

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Beyoncé puts a conversation about Africa on the front line with her visual album Black Is King, which premiered on Disney+. Parkwood Entertainment/Disney + via AP hide caption

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Parkwood Entertainment/Disney + via AP

Coronavirus patients play a game of carrom inside the COVID-19 Care Centre at CWG Village Sports Complex in New Delhi on Thursday. Mohd Zakir/Hindustan Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Mohd Zakir/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

Klaus Teuber, creator of the popular board game Catan, with his son Benjamin Teuber, a managing director at Catan Inc. Celebrating the 25th anniversary of the game's launch, the elder Teuber has released an autobiography, My Way to Catan. Patrick Liste hide caption

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Patrick Liste

Families Stuck At Home Turn To Board Game Catan, Sending Sales Skyrocketing

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People walk in Stockholm on July 27, most without the face masks that have become common on the streets of many other countries as a method of fighting the spread of the coronavirus. Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP via Getty Images

Defense Secretary Mark Esper, pictured last month, spoke with his Chinese counterpart Thursday amid strained relations between the two countries. Michael Reynolds/AP hide caption

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Michael Reynolds/AP

Search and rescue workers sift through damaged buildings Thursday in Beirut after this week's huge explosion at the Lebanese capital's port caused widespread damage. Houssam Shbaro/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Houssam Shbaro/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Beirut Explosion Update: Lebanon Detains 16 People In Inquiry As Anger Mounts

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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo testifies before a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing in July. The State Department has lifted its global health advisory warning against international travel. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe bows Thursday in front of a memorial to people who were killed in the 1945 atomic bombing of Hiroshima. Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images

Hiroshima Atomic Bombing Raising New Questions 75 Years Later

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Maria Ressa, CEO of the Rappler news site, leaves a Philippine regional trial court after being convicted for cyber libel on June 15. Ressa, a veteran journalist and outspoken critic of President Rodrigo Duterte, is the focus of A Thousand Cuts, a documentary to be released virtually in the U.S. on Aug. 7. Ezra Acayan/Getty Images hide caption

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Ezra Acayan/Getty Images

Philippine Journalist Maria Ressa: 'Journalism Is Activism'

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Former Colombian President (2002-2010) and Sen. Álvaro Uribe goes to a hearing before the Supreme Court of Justice in a case over witness tampering in Bogotá, Colombia, on Oct. 8, 2019. The Supreme Court has now ordered Uribe be put under house arrest. Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images

Colombia's Ex-President Uribe Is Put Under House Arrest, Catches Coronavirus

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An aerial view of demolished structures at the port, damaged by Tuesday's explosion in Beirut, Lebanon on Wednesday. The enormous blast, which officials said was driven by thousands of tons of ammonium nitrate, killed at least 137 people and injured thousands more. Haytham El Achkar/Getty Images hide caption

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Haytham El Achkar/Getty Images

Beirut Death Toll Rises After Enormous Explosion

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Aboubakar Soumahoro speaks at a protest in Rome last month. "If the workers lack dignity and rights, the food they provide is virtually rotten," he says in a new short documentary, The Invisibles. Patrizia Cortellessa/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrizia Cortellessa/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

In Italy, A Migrants' Advocate Fights For The 'Invisibles'

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Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi (center) performs the groundbreaking ceremony of a temple dedicated to the Hindu god Lord Ram in Ayodhya, India, on Wednesday. Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP hide caption

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Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP

Stimulus checks are prepared on May 8, 2008, in Philadelphia. In 2020, stimulus checks again went to many Americans, this time during the pandemic's economic fallout. Some of that money went to thousands of foreign workers not eligible to receive the funds. Jeff Fusco/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Fusco/Getty Images

Foreign Workers Living Overseas Mistakenly Received $1,200 U.S. Stimulus Checks

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