World News and International Headlines NPR world news, international art and culture, world business and financial markets, world economy, and global trends in health, science and technology. Subscribe to the World Story of the Day podcast and RSS feed.

NPRWorld

Many Stories, One World

U.S. military vehicles drive on a road in the town of Tal Tamr on Sunday after pulling out of a base in northern Syria. Defense Secretary Mark Esper says some troops may remain in northeast Syria to secure oil fields. Delil Souleiman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Delil Souleiman/AFP via Getty Images

This notice on a cigarette packet in Thailand shows the potential impact of reduced blood circulation to extremities because of smoking. Such pictorial warnings are among the anti-smoking measures that are more likely to be found in countries that have limited Big Tobacco's influence on their politics, according to the new Global Tobacco Industry Interference Index. Apichart Weerawong/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Apichart Weerawong/AP

Kamel Guemari is a manager of a McDonald's in a neighborhood in Marseille, France, that's known for crime and drug gangs. He has been leading an employee charge to save the restaurant, which has become a vital community anchor in an under-resourced immigrant neighborhood. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

Save The .... McDonald's? One Franchise In France Has Become A Social Justice Cause

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/771269951/771820337" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Michael Stumo and his wife Nadia Milleron, whose daughter was killed in the Ethiopian Airlines Flight crash, attend a House committee hearing June 19. They and other victims' families have been a driving force in the campaign to keep the Boeing 737 Max grounded. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Crash Victim's Family Pushes To Keep Boeing 737 Max From Flying Again Too Soon

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/768285559/771820343" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Ambassador to China Terry Branstad, left, with U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, and Chinese Vice Premier Liu He, right, after concluding a meeting at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing, in May. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andy Wong/AP

U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper (center), is greeted by U.S. military personnel upon arriving in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Sunday. Lolita C. Balbor/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Lolita C. Balbor/AP

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks to a room of supporters at a campaign rally in Vaughan, Canada, on Friday. Cole Burston/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Cole Burston/Getty Images

Justin Trudeau Battles For His Political Survival As Canada Gets Ready To Vote

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/771424706/771759967" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Firefighter Pinyo Pukpinyo holds a Burmese python. In 16 years of snake wrangling, he says he has been bitten more than 20 times but helping people desperate to get rid of snakes in their homes "makes me happy." Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Sullivan for NPR

Scientists use a microscope to see if the genetic modification is spreading. Immature modified mosquitoes glow red with yellow eyes when illuminated with a laser. Pierre Kattar for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Pierre Kattar for NPR

In the forests near the southern Sumatran village of Krui, 48-year-old Marhana climbs up the trees to harvest damar, a resin used in paints and varnishes. These damar trees are part of something called an "agroforest," which experts see as a way to prevent deforestation and conversion of forests into palm oil plantations. Julia Simon for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Julia Simon for NPR

Could This Tree Be An Eco-Friendly Way To Wean Indonesian Farmers Off Palm Oil?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/771410815/771599524" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In this photo taken Thursday, flames and smoke billow from a fire on a target in Ras al-Ayn, Syria. This is the result of shelling by Turkish forces, the same day Turkey and the U.S. were negotiating a cease-fire agreement. Cavit Ozgul/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Cavit Ozgul/AP

Kurdish General Slams U.S.-Syria Policy; Gen. Petraeus Calls Withdrawal 'A Betrayal'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/771546293/771599518" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Men take pictures of a burning car during violent protests in Santiago Saturday. Claudio Reyes/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Claudio Reyes/AFP via Getty Images

Protesters wave Catalan independence flags in the street in Barcelona, Spain, on Friday, following a week of demonstrations over the prison sentences given to separatist politicians by Spain's Supreme Court. Clara Margais/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Clara Margais/Getty Images

Addario's coverage of maternal mortality took her to a remote village in Badakhshan province, Afghanistan in 2009, where she photographed a midwife giving a prenatal check in a private home. "In these areas someone will announce that a doctor and a midwife are coming, and any pregnant and lactating women within a certain radius come if they want prenatal or postnatal care," she says. Lynsey Addario hide caption

toggle caption
Lynsey Addario

Syrians fleeing the Turkish incursion in northeastern Syria receive bedding materials as they arrive at a camp in Dohuk, Iraq, on Thursday. Byron Smith/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Byron Smith/Getty Images

'We Didn't Believe We Would See The Sun Rise': Refugees From Syria Arrive In Iraq

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/771253640/771363456" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Fighting continued early Friday in a northeast Syrian border town at the center of the fight between Turkey and Kurdish forces, despite a U.S.-brokered cease-fire that went into effect overnight. Emrah Gurel/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Emrah Gurel/AP

A volunteer carries an injured youth to a hospital after an explosion that killed at least 62 people in the Haska Mina district of Nangarhar province Friday. Noorullah Shirzada/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Noorullah Shirzada/AFP via Getty Images

Smoke from burning cars rises in Culiacán, Mexico, on Thursday, after an intense gunfight between security forces and gunmen linked to the Sinaloa drug cartel. Hector Parra/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Hector Parra/AP

Massive Gun Battle Erupts In Mexico Over Son Of Drug Kingpin 'El Chapo'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/771216750/771412721" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript