Your Health News and commentary about personal health, medicine, healthcare, drugs, diet, recipes, and nutrition. Download the Your Health podcast and subscribe to our RSS feed.

Australia had a particularly hard flu season this year, which may predict similar challenges for the U.S. Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP/Getty Images

In The U.S., Flu Season Could Be Unusually Harsh This Year

Audio for this story is unavailable.

I guess it's too late to change my mind. Aşkın Dursun KAMBEROĞLU/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Aşkın Dursun KAMBEROĞLU/Getty Images

Why Your Brain Has Trouble Bailing Out Of A Bad Plan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/569188070/569222337" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sales surged for guns, such as these seen at a show in Kenner, La., in late 2012, after the mass shooting in Newtown, Conn. Julie Dermansky/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Julie Dermansky/Corbis via Getty Images
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Even Low-Dose Contraceptives Slightly Increase Breast Cancer Risk

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/568836583/568920367" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hairdressers spend more time looking at the tops of heads than anyone else, so are well positioned to spot suspicious skin changes. CommerceandCultureAgency/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
CommerceandCultureAgency/Getty Images

The first baby born as a result of a womb transplant in the United States in the neonatal unit at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

First Baby Born To U.S. Uterus Transplant Patient Raises Ethics Questions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/568453168/568653576" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

CVS Health has struck a deal to buy Aetna, the insurance giant. The combined companies would have more clout with drugmakers and would aim to bring more health care to consumers in retail clinics. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gene J. Puskar/AP

A JUUL e-cigarette for sale at Fast Eddie's Smoke Shop in Boston. The sleek devices are easy to conceal, which makes them popular with teenagers. Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images
Kristen Uroda for NPR

Tylenol May Help Ease The Pain Of Hurt Feelings

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/567762087/568255260" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Simone Golob/Getty Images

New Drugs Could Prevent Migraine Headaches For Some People

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/567804150/568255254" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A memorial honoring victims of the AIDS epidemic sits across the street from the former St. Vincent's Hospital site in New York City, where many of the early victims of AIDS were diagnosed. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Proposed changes to the tax law could eliminate the deduction for medical expenses. Those who use it generally have very high medical expenses, often for a disabled child, a serious chronic illness or expensive long-term care not covered by health insurance. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
PeopleImages/Getty Images

Chalfonte LeNee Queen of San Diego grappled with violent vomiting episodes for 17 years until she found out her illness was related to her marijuana use. Pauline Bartolone/California Healthline hide caption

toggle caption
Pauline Bartolone/California Healthline

Peter Saltonstall, president of the National Organization of Rare Disorders, speaks at a rally Tuesday in support of tax credits for companies that develop drugs for rare diseases. Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN

Bacterial cells can now read a synthetic genetic code and use it to assemble proteins containing man-made parts. Gary Bates/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gary Bates/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Scientists Train Bacteria To Build Unnatural Proteins

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/567171158/567313615" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Pasieka/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Gene Therapy Shows Promise For A Growing List Of Diseases

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/565728869/567155749" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript