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Chase Kulakowski, 3, contracted the polio-like condition known as acute flaccid myelitis in 2016. Two years later, his mother isn't sure he will ever recover. He's seen on his bed at home in Dyer, Ind., in October. Armando L. Sanchez/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Armando L. Sanchez/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images

Cases Of Mysterious Paralyzing Condition Continue To Increase, CDC Says

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Getting physical activity every day can help maintain health throughout your life. Ronnie Kaufman/Larry Hirshowitz/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

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Ronnie Kaufman/Larry Hirshowitz/Getty Images/Blend Images

New Physical Activity Guidelines Urge Americans: Move More, Sit Less

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Taking fish oil supplements to prevent cardiovascular disease and cancer may not be effective, a new study suggests. Cathy Scola/Getty Images hide caption

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Cathy Scola/Getty Images

Vitamin D And Fish Oil Supplements Mostly Disappoint In Long-Awaited Research Results

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There's been an increase in vaping in teens, but e-cigarette manufacturers say it's a safer alternative to smoking. Martina Paraninfi/Getty Images hide caption

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Martina Paraninfi/Getty Images

FDA Cracks Down On E-Cigarette Sales To Curb Teen Vaping

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Patients awaiting epilepsy surgery agreed to keep a running log of their mood while researchers used tiny wires to monitor electrical activity in their brains. The combination revealed a circuit for sadness. Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Researchers Uncover A Circuit For Sadness In The Human Brain

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The sweetened beverage industry has spent millions to combat soda taxes and support medical groups that avoid blaming sugary drinks for health problems. Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images hide caption

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Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images

Shoppers who rely on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program may find it harder to use their benefits to purchase fresh fruit and vegetables at farmers markets like this one in Minneapolis, Minn., while the goverment changes contractors. Ariana Lindquist/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ariana Lindquist/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Tetris and other absorbing brain games can get you into a "flow" state that relieves stress. Mary Mathis/NPR hide caption

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Mary Mathis/NPR

Can't Stop Worrying? Try Tetris To Ease Your Mind

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How does the brain's working memory actually work? Jon Berkeley/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Berkeley/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Neuroscientists Debate A Simple Question: How Does The Brain Store A Phone Number?

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

We Just 'Fell Back' An Hour. Here Are Tips To Stay Healthy During Dark Days Ahead

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Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, testifying before a House subcommittee in May. There are "very tight restrictions" being placed on the distribution and use of Dsuvia, Gottlieb said Friday in addressing the FDA's approval of the new opioid. But critics of the FDA decision say the drug is unnecessary. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Catherine Guthrie decided not to get breast reconstruction after her double mastectomy in 2009. Not Putting on a Shirt is a grassroots advocacy organization that brings attention to the issue of surgeons disregarding breast cancer patients' wishes to go flat. Courtesy of Catherine Guthrie hide caption

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Courtesy of Catherine Guthrie

For older mothers, it can feel like there's little time to waste before trying for another child. But there are real risks linked to getting pregnant again too soon. Lauren Bates/Getty Images hide caption

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Lauren Bates/Getty Images

A McDonald's billboard in St. Paul, Minn., advertises in the Hmong language. A new study of first- and second-generation Hmong and Karen immigrants finds their gut microbiomes changed soon after moving to the U.S. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Getting people of different ethnicities and cultural backgrounds into clinical trials is not only a question of equity, doctors say. It's also a scientific imperative to make sure candidate drugs work and are safe in a broad cross-section of people. Richard Bailey/Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Bailey/Getty Images

Evelyn Marie Vukadinovich is swabbed with a gauze pad immediately after being born by cesarean section at Inova Women's Hospital in Falls Church, Va. Mary Mathis/NPR hide caption

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Mary Mathis/NPR

Doctors Test Bacterial Smear After Cesarean Sections To Bolster Babies' Microbiomes

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Food assistance recipients spend about 10 percent of their food budget on sugary drinks, while the rest of the population spends about 7 percent. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Janet Winston stands in her rose garden in Eureka, Calif. Testing revealed she is allergic to numerous substances, including linalool. Winston still can handle roses, which contain linalool, but she can't wear perfumes and cosmetic products that contain the compound. Alexandra Hootnick hide caption

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Alexandra Hootnick

Bill Of The Month: A $48,329 Allergy Test Is A Lot Of Scratch

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The cerebellum, a brain structure humans share with fish and lizards, appears to control the quality of many functions in the brain, according to a team of researchers. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

The Underestimated Cerebellum Gains New Respect From Brain Scientists

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Microplastics are not just showing up on beaches like this one in the Canary Islands — a very small study shows that they are in human waste in many parts of the world. Desiree Martin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Desiree Martin/AFP/Getty Images