Your Health News and commentary about personal health, medicine, healthcare, drugs, diet, recipes, and nutrition. Download the Your Health podcast and subscribe to our RSS feed.

Your Health

A new study finds that COVID-19 vaccines produce effective levels of antibodies in pregnant and breastfeeding women. They may benefit babies as well. Jamie Grill/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jamie Grill/Getty Images

More than 50 million people in the United States suffer from allergies. Arterra/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

toggle caption
Arterra/Universal Images Group via Getty

Micro Wave: Are Seasonal Allergies Getting Worse?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/978197539/983509114" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An Emergent BioSolutions facility in Baltimore on Thursday. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Johnson & Johnson Says Contractor Botched Part Of Vaccine Production

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/983380847/983394120" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Dialysis clinics are often located in areas that are underserved by other forms of health care. And many already vaccinate their patients against other illnesses. Bruno Maccanti Pescador/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bruno Maccanti Pescador/Getty Images

Some immunocompromised people are wondering whether or when to get the COVID-19 vaccine. Sarahbeth Maney/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sarahbeth Maney/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images

Immunocompromised And Concerned About The Vaccine? Here's What You Need To Know

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/981767390/982599369" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Food journalist Barry Estabrook talks with diet gurus and sifts through dieting history and the latest nutrition studies. He discovers that unfortunately, these diets don't really work in the long term for most people because they are too strict or require unnatural patterns of eating. Michele Abercrombie/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Michele Abercrombie/NPR

With precautions such as mask-wearing in place, experts predict travel is among the activities that may become safer by this summer. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The Future Of The Pandemic In The U.S.: Experts Look Ahead

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/976146368/980739653" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Lawmakers in the Idaho House of Representatives debate a bill this week. The Idaho Legislature has recessed until April 6 due to an outbreak of COVID-19 among members and staff. Keith Ridler/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Keith Ridler/AP

Even with some colleges canceling their midsemester breaks due to COVID-19, students from more than 200 schools are expected to visit Miami Beach during spring break, which runs until mid-April. Eva Marie Uzcatequi/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Eva Marie Uzcatequi/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Planning A Spring Break? These 5 Tips Can Help Minimize Risk

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/975891969/977332847" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A health care worker at a drive-through site in Greenville, Miss., administers a COVID-19 vaccine shot in January. Mississippi was one of the first states to add a body mass index of 30 or more (a rough gauge of obesity) to its current list of qualifying medical conditions for vaccine eligibility. Rory Doyle/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Rory Doyle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Andrew Brookes/Getty Images/Image Source

In early September 2020, Seattle, Wash., had some of the worst air quality in the world because of wildfire smoke. The city was among the first to create smoke shelters for the most vulnerable. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Nathan Rott/NPR

A medical worker at South Shore University Hospital gets ready to administer the newly available Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine in Bay Shore, N.Y., Wednesday. Clinical research found it to be 85% effective in preventing severe disease four weeks after vaccination, and it has demonstrated promising indications of protection against a couple of concerning variants of the coronavirus. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Got Questions About Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 Vaccine? We Have Answers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/973436193/974370904" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As a researcher at the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle, Alice Mukora says she understands the need to enroll diverse populations in Alzheimer's research. But that would be more likely to happen, she notes, if people of color had better experiences getting Alzheimer's care. Siri Stafford/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Siri Stafford/Getty Images

'Providers Don't Even Listen': Barriers To Alzheimer's Care When You're Not White

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/972648710/972742663" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A health care worker draws a dose of Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine into a syringe for an immunization event in the parking lot of the L.A. Mission on Feb. 24. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Could A Single-Dose Of COVID-19 Vaccine After Illness Stretch The Supply?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/972563440/972597388" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices voted 12-0, with one recusal, to recommend the use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine for people aged 18 and older. Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images

A health care worker holds a vial of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine at Klerksdorp Hospital in Klerksdorp, South Africa, on Feb. 18. PHILL MAGAKOE/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
PHILL MAGAKOE/AFP via Getty Images

At a Kedren Community Health Center vaccine clinic in South Central Los Angeles this month, 89-year-old Cecilia Onwytalu (center) signals she's more than ready to get her immunization against COVID-19. Apu Gomes/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Apu Gomes/Getty Images

Race Versus Time: Targeting Vaccine To The Most Vulnerable Is No Speedy Task

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/969384904/970435315" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript