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Kansas state Rep. Stephanie Clayton, an abortion rights supporter who was a Republican and is now a Democrat, reacts as a referendum to strip abortion rights out of the state constitution fails. Danielle Kurtzleben/NPR hide caption

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Danielle Kurtzleben/NPR

After multiple nights of abortion-rights protests, security fences and barbed wire surround the Arizona Capitol, Monday, June 27, 2022, in Phoenix. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

Political signs for the state constitutional amendment vote on abortion rights in Kansas sit near each other in yards in Overland Park, Kan., July 16, 2022. Dylan Lysen/Kansas News Service hide caption

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Dylan Lysen/Kansas News Service

A bag of assorted pills and prescription drugs is dropped off for disposal during the Drug Enforcement Administration's National Prescription Drug Take Back Day on April 24, 2021 in Los Angeles. Patrick T. Falon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Falon/AFP via Getty Images

New book chronicles how America's opioid industry operated like a drug cartel

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Protesters who oppose a state constitutional amendment that would remove the right to abortion in Kansas march around the Kansas Statehouse in Topeka. Dylan Lysen/Kansas News Service hide caption

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Dylan Lysen/Kansas News Service

Michigan Republican candidates for governor Ryan Kelley, from left, Garrett Soldano, Tudor Dixon and Kevin Rinke appear at a debate in Grand Rapids, Mich., July 6, 2022. Michael Buck/AP hide caption

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Michael Buck/AP
Valeriy Kachaev/Spruce Books

How to know when you spend too much time online and need to log off

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The Biden administration plans to offer updated booster shots in the fall. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Summer boosters for people under 50 shelved in favor of updated boosters in the fall

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Triangle Square Books for Young Readers/Seven Stories Press

How one author is aspiring to make sex education more relatable for today's kids

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The Montana Supreme Court hears oral arguments in a case at the University of Montana's Jane and George Dennison Theatre in Missoula, Mont., on April 15. Freddy Monares/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Freddy Monares/Montana Public Radio

Some states are laser-focused on supreme court elections after the Dobbs ruling

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An image provided by the Environmental Protection Agency shows examples of a lead pipe, left, a corroded steel pipe, center, and a lead pipe treated with protective orthophosphate. The EPA is only now requiring water systems to take stock of their lead pipes, decades after new ones were banned. Environmental Protection Agency hide caption

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Environmental Protection Agency

People under 50 might have a chance at a second booster shot the summer depending what federal health officials decide. Those 50 and older have been eligible for the shots since March. Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

U.S. debates a summer booster for people under 50

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Since the US Supreme Court ruling that overturned the right to abortion, there's been an increase in demand for contraceptives. "Birth control," "IUD" and even medical sterilization have all jumped in internet search trends, and some retailers and drugstore chains have limited purchases of emergency contraceptives to cope with demand. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

As States Ban Abortion, Demand For Contraceptives Is Rising

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