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Frank Lettiere's eyebrows and eyelashes froze after his walk along Lake Michigan's Chicago shoreline Wednesday. Frostbite warnings were issued for parts of the U.S. Midwest as temperatures plunged. Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images

Medical Effects Of Extreme Cold: Why It Hurts And How To Stay Safe

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A British study found that people who used e-cigarettes to quit smoking were more successful than those who tried nicotine patches and gum. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Study Found Vaping Beat Traditional Smoking-Cessation Options

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"There's a certain notion that e-cigarettes are harmless," says Dr. Paul Ndunda, an assistant professor at the School of Medicine at the University of Kansas in Wichita. "But ... while they're less harmful than normal cigarettes, their use still comes with risks." RyanJLane/Getty Images hide caption

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Ariel Davis for NPR

From Fruit Fly To Stink Eye: Searching For Anger's Animal Roots

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Matt Gleason fainted at work after getting a flu shot, so colleagues called 911 and an ambulance took him to the ER. Eight hours later, Gleason went home with a clean bill of health. Later still he got a hefty bill that wiped out his deductible. Logan Cyrus for KHN hide caption

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Logan Cyrus for KHN

A Fainting Spell After A Flu Shot Leads To $4,692 ER Visit

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To tame your anger, it may help to take time to observe and name it. Ariel Davis for NPR hide caption

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Ariel Davis for NPR

Got Anger? Try Naming It To Tame It

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Skeletal muscle cells from a rabbit were stained with fluorescent markers to highlight cell nuclei (blue) and proteins in the cytoskeleton (red and green). Daniel Schroen, Cell Applications Inc./Science Source hide caption

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Daniel Schroen, Cell Applications Inc./Science Source

Shoppers say they want simpler information to help them figure out which foods are healthy. But a one-size-fits-all solution may not work. asiseeit/Getty Images hide caption

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When a former patient died from a lethal combination of methadone and Benadryl, Dr. Ako Jacintho got a letter from the state medical board. Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

California Doctors Alarmed As State Links Their Opioid Prescriptions to Deaths

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A scanning electron micrograph shows microglial cells (yellow) ingesting branched oligodendrocyte cells (purple), a process thought to occur in multiple sclerosis. Oligodendrocytes form insulating myelin sheaths around nerve axons in the central nervous system. Dr. John Zajicek/Science Source hide caption

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Dr. John Zajicek/Science Source

Sarah Spiegel, a third-year student at New York Medical College, pushed for more education on LGBT health issues for students. Mengwen Cao for NPR hide caption

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Mengwen Cao for NPR

Even something as simple as chopping up food on a regular basis can be enough exercise to help protect older people from showing signs of dementia, a new study suggests. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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Daily Movement — Even Household Chores — May Boost Brain Health In Elderly

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"Feeling better isn't just this selfish, hedonic thing — it actually is fuel. I consider energy from taking care of yourself as essential fuel for the things that matter most in our lives," says Michelle Segar, a psychologist at the University of Michigan who studies how we sustain healthy behaviors like exercise. Saviour Giyorges / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium hide caption

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Saviour Giyorges / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium

From Couch Potato To Fitness Buff: How I Learned To Love Exercise

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Left to right: The trainer demonstrates squats with a chair, pull-ups with a towel wrapped around a banister and jumping jack intervals. Jenna Sterner/NPR hide caption

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Jenna Sterner/NPR

Get Fit — Faster: This 22-Minute Workout Has You Covered

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