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Getting people of different ethnicities and cultural backgrounds into clinical trials is not only a question of equity, doctors say. It's also a scientific imperative to make sure candidate drugs work and are safe in a broad cross-section of people. Richard Bailey/Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Bailey/Getty Images

Evelyn Marie Vukadinovich is swabbed with a gauze pad immediately after being born by cesarean section at Inova Women's Hospital in Falls Church, Va. Mary Mathis/NPR hide caption

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Mary Mathis/NPR

Doctors Test Bacterial Smear After Cesarean Sections To Bolster Babies' Microbiomes

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Food assistance recipients spend about 10 percent of their food budget on sugary drinks, while the rest of the population spends about 7 percent. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Janet Winston stands in her rose garden in Eureka, Calif. Testing revealed she is allergic to numerous substances, including linalool. Winston still can handle roses, which contain linalool, but she can't wear perfumes and cosmetic products that contain the compound. Alexandra Hootnick hide caption

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Alexandra Hootnick

Bill Of The Month: A $48,329 Allergy Test Is A Lot Of Scratch

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The cerebellum, a brain structure humans share with fish and lizards, appears to control the quality of many functions in the brain, according to a team of researchers. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

The Underestimated Cerebellum Gains New Respect From Brain Scientists

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Microplastics are not just showing up on beaches like this one in the Canary Islands — a very small study shows that they are in human waste in many parts of the world. Desiree Martin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Desiree Martin/AFP/Getty Images

A major study published Monday finds that widely prescribed antipsychotic drugs like haloperidol are no more effective than a placebo for treating delirium. Nehru Sulejmanovski/Getty Images hide caption

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Nehru Sulejmanovski/Getty Images

Antipsychotic Drugs Don't Ease ICU Delirium

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When you get hearing aids, it can help you stay more stimulated and socially engaged. Fancy/Veer/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Fancy/Veer/Corbis/Getty Images

Want To Keep Your Brain Sharp? Take Care Of Your Eyes And Ears

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

A New Prescription For Depression: Join A Team And Get Sweaty

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University of Oregon scientists used real dust from inside homes around Portland to test the effects of sunlight, UV light and darkness on bacteria found in the dust. Dave G Kelly/Getty Images hide caption

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Dave G Kelly/Getty Images

The authors of a new study on veterinarians and mental health say vet school should include more training on how to cope with the moral distress vets face when asked by pet owners to do things that are against their medical judgment. Anya Semenoff/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Anya Semenoff/Denver Post via Getty Images

"I am frustrated that despite all of our efforts, we haven't been able to identify the cause of this mystery illness," said Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. James Leynse/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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James Leynse/Corbis/Getty Images

CDC Investigates Cases Of Rare Neurological 'Mystery Illness' In Kids

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According to the law in most states, health care providers own patients' medical records. But federal privacy law governs how that information can be used. And whether or not you can profit from your own medical data is murky. alicemoi/Getty Images/RooM RF hide caption

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alicemoi/Getty Images/RooM RF

If Your Medical Information Becomes A Moneymaker, Could You Get A Cut?

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Shared scooters and bicycles are spreading to several major U.S. cities while policymakers are scrambling to find ways to ensure that riders are safe. David Paul Morris/Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Getty Images

As E-Scooters Roll Into American Cities, So Do Safety Concerns

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Charlie Hinderliter got a bad case of the flu back in January. He spent 58 days in the hospital, underwent two surgeries and was in a medically induced coma for a week. Neeta Satam for NPR hide caption

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Neeta Satam for NPR

Last Year, The Flu Put Him In A Coma. This Year He's Getting The Shot

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