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Chalfonte LeNee Queen of San Diego grappled with violent vomiting episodes for 17 years until she found out her illness was related to her marijuana use. Pauline Bartolone/California Healthline hide caption

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Pauline Bartolone/California Healthline

Rare And Mysterious Vomiting Illness Linked To Heavy Marijuana Use

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Peter Saltonstall, president of the National Organization of Rare Disorders, speaks at a rally Tuesday in support of tax credits for companies that develop drugs for rare diseases. Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN

Bacterial cells can now read a synthetic genetic code and use it to assemble proteins containing man-made parts. Gary Bates/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Bates/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Scientists Train Bacteria To Build Unnatural Proteins

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Pasieka/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Gene Therapy Shows Promise For A Growing List Of Diseases

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Christina Arenas reviews her medical bills at home in Washington, D.C. She complained about a mammogram and ultrasounds that she felt were unnecessary and sought a refund. Allison Shelley hide caption

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Allison Shelley

Epidemic Of Health Care Waste: From $1,877 Ear Piercing To ICU Overuse

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A Quechua woman tends to her clay oven in her outdoor kitchen on the road to the Sillustani archaeological site in Puno, Peru. The stone table is laid with a collection of potatoes and other tubers, as well as homemade cheese and bread. Tony Dunnell hide caption

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Tony Dunnell

When young people turn 18, they typically sign their own paperwork before receiving medical care that says they will pay what the insurer doesn't cover. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images

Advertisements paid for by tobacco companies say their products are deadly and were manipulated to be more addictive. Tobacco Free Kids hide caption

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Tobacco Free Kids

In Ads, Tobacco Companies Admit They Made Cigarettes More Addictive

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Donnal Walker, 52, returned home to find his HIV pills floating in floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey. He went 11 days without medication. Sarah Varney/KHN hide caption

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Sarah Varney/KHN

If you're regularly checking your phone at night in a dark room, you're probably tricking your body into thinking it's still daytime. Artur Debat/Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Artur Debat/Moment Editorial/Getty Images

Apps Can Cut Blue Light From Devices, But Do They Help You Sleep?

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Light Therapy Might Help People With Bipolar Depression

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Lauren Kafka rented a machine that delivered cold water and compression to manage pain after rotator cuff surgery. Her insurance company said it wasn't medically necessary and refused to pay for it. Courtesy of Alexander C. Kafka hide caption

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Courtesy of Alexander C. Kafka