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Mine Cicek, an assistant professor at the Mayo Clinic, processes samples for the All of Us program. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Richard Harris/NPR

Researchers Gather Health Data For 'All Of Us'

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Dr. James Mold, a family physician and author of Achieving Your Personal Health Goals, says doctors should work with their patients to set mutually agreed-upon goals throughout life. Sarinyapinngam/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Sarinyapinngam/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Careful custody of blood tests and tissue samples is essential to the success of precision medicine. David Silverman/Getty Images hide caption

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David Silverman/Getty Images

Precision Medical Treatments Have A Quality Control Problem

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Volunteer Greg Ruegsegger is outfitted with monitors, a catheter threaded into a vein and a mask to capture his breath in an experiment run by Joyner to measure human performance. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Richard Harris/NPR

Will Gathering Vast Troves of Information Really Lead To Better Health?

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Young bodies may more easily rebound from long bouts of sitting, with just an hour at the gym. But research suggests physical recovery from binge TV-watching gets harder in our 50s and as we get older. Lily Padula for NPR hide caption

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Lily Padula for NPR

Home For The Holidays? Get Off The Couch!

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Carl Luepker, his son Liam, 12, and daughter Lucia, 11, light the menorah during Hanukkah in their home in Minneapolis, Minn. Carl and Liam both have a degenerative nerve disorder called dystonia. Jenn Ackerman for NPR hide caption

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Jenn Ackerman for NPR

Could Brain Surgery Save A Father And Son?

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Leah Bahrencu, 35, of Austin, Texas, developed an infection after an emergency C-section to deliver twins Lukas and Sorana, now 11 months. Ilana Panich-Linsman hide caption

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Ilana Panich-Linsman

Jim Carrey stars as the title character the 2000 version of How The Grinch Stole Christmas. Archive Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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Heart 2 Sizes Too Small? Mr. Grinch, See Your Cardiologist

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Kelley Mui helps a client sign up for health insurance through the Affordable Care Act on Dec. 15 at the Midwest Asian Health Association in Chicago. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Life expectancy in the U.S. has fallen for the second straight year, in part because of the surge of overdoses on opioids, such as oxycodone. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Life Expectancy Drops Again As Opioid Deaths Surge In U.S.

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Scientists Use Gene Editing To Prevent A Form Of Deafness In Mice

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Samantha Pierce of Cleveland has a 7-year-old daughter, Camryn. In 2009, Pierce gave premature birth to twins. The babies did not survive. Scientists say black women lead more stressful lives, which makes them more likely to give birth prematurely and puts their babies at risk of dying. Dustin Franz for NPR hide caption

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Dustin Franz for NPR

How Racism May Cause Black Mothers To Suffer The Death Of Their Infants

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