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Researchers say human brains can become overwhelmed by cute traits, such as large eyes and small noses, embodied by movie characters like Bambi. Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images hide caption

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Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images

When Too Cute Is Too Much, The Brain Can Get Aggressive

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Coconut oil's potential health benefits are outweighed by its heavy dose of saturated fat, most nutrition experts say. Saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of heart attack and stroke. Russ Rohde/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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Russ Rohde/Getty Images/Cultura RF

Is Coconut Oil All It's Cracked Up To Be? Get The Facts On This Faddish Fat

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Robert and Tiffany Cano of San Tan Valley, Ariz., have a new marriage, a new house and a 10-month-old son, Brody. Since Brody was born, the Canos have racked up nearly $12,000 in medical debt. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Sarah Witter had two operations to repair bones in her lower left leg after a skiing accident last February. The second surgery was needed to replace a stabilizing plate that broke. Matt Baldelli for KHN hide caption

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Matt Baldelli for KHN
Kristen Uroda for NPR

If You Feel Thankful, Write It Down. It's Good For Your Health

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Research inspired by soccer headers has led to fresh insights into how the brain weathers hits to the head. Photo illustration by David Madison/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo illustration by David Madison/Getty Images

Bad Vibes: How Hits To The Head Are Transferred To The Brain

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Before light reaches these rods and cones in the retina, it passes through some specialized cells that send signals to brain areas that affect whether you feel happy or sad. Omikron /Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

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Omikron /Getty Images/Science Source

Scientists Find A Brain Circuit That Could Explain Seasonal Depression

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Susie Christoff tried several drugs to cope with her painful psoriatic arthritis before finding Cosentyx worked the best. The problem was the cost. Chris Bartlett/for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Chris Bartlett/for Kaiser Health News

Why The U.S. Remains The Most Expensive Market For 'Biologic' Drugs In The World

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U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams said Tuesday that local restrictions, including bans on indoor vaping, are needed to reduce youth e-cigarette use. Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images

Sarah Witter fractured two bones in her lower left leg while skiing in Vermont last February. She had two operations to repair the damage. The second surgery was needed to replace a metal plate that broke after it was implanted. Matt Baldelli for KHN hide caption

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Matt Baldelli for KHN

Bill Of The Month: $43,208 For Repeat Surgery To Replace Broken Medical Device

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Patients and advocates have become an important part of the annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

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Noam Galai/Getty Images

"People have to be alive to get the help that they need," said Brittney Webster, who got free naloxone at a health center in Carlisle, Pa. Brett Sholtis/WITF hide caption

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Brett Sholtis/WITF