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Hundreds of health care providers around the United States allow their patients to use Apple's Health app to store their medical records. Apple hide caption

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Apple

Storing Health Records On Your Phone: Can Apple Live Up To Its Privacy Values?

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The common practice of double-booking a lead surgeon's time and letting junior physicians supervise and complete some parts of a surgery is safe for most patients, a study of more than 60,000 operations finds. But there may be a small added risk for a subset of patients. Ian Lishman/Getty Images hide caption

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Ian Lishman/Getty Images

Carol Marley, a hospital nurse with private insurance, says coping with the financial fallout of her pancreatic cancer has been exhausting. Anna Gorman/KHN hide caption

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Anna Gorman/KHN

Cancer Complications: Confusing Bills, Maddening Errors And Endless Phone Calls

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Jeannette Parker, an animal-loving biologist, stopped to feed a stray cat in a rural area outside Florida's Everglades National Park. Instead of showing appreciation, the cat bit her. Angel Valentín for KHN hide caption

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Angel Valentín for KHN

Cat Bites The Hand That Feeds; Hospital Bills $48,512

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A child takes in the sights under blooming Japanese cherry trees at the Bispebjerg Cemetery in Copenhagen, Denmark. Mads Claus Rasmussen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mads Claus Rasmussen/AFP/Getty Images
Ariel Davis for NPR

Anger Can Be Contagious — Here's How To Stop The Spread

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CVS plans to transform some of its stores into "health hubs," retail locations revamped to include more health care services and products. One of the first is in Spring, Texas, a suburb of Houston. Alison Kodjak/NPR hide caption

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Alison Kodjak/NPR

CVS Looks To Make Its Drugstores A Destination For Health Care

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Genetically modified "gene drive" mosquitoes feed on warm cow's blood. Scientists hope these mosquitoes could help eradicate malaria. Pierre Kattar for NPR hide caption

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Pierre Kattar for NPR

Scientists Release Controversial Genetically Modified Mosquitoes In High-Security Lab

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Their research is still in early stages, but Kristin Myers (left), a mechanical engineer, and Dr. Joy Vink, an OB-GYN, both at Columbia University, have already learned that cervical tissue is a more complicated mix of material than doctors ever realized. Adrienne Grunwald for NPR hide caption

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Adrienne Grunwald for NPR

Scientific Duo Gets Back To Basics To Make Childbirth Safer

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Dramatic decreases in deaths from lung cancer among African-Americans were particularly notable, according to the American Cancer Society. Siri Stafford/Getty Images hide caption

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Siri Stafford/Getty Images

Scientists around the world criticized Chinese researcher He Jiankui's experimental editing of DNA in embryos that became twin girls. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

Hesitancy about vaccination in a community has a lot to do with acculturation to its norms. Karl Tapales/Getty Images hide caption

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Karl Tapales/Getty Images

Medical Anthropologist Explores 'Vaccine Hesitancy'

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Image Source/Getty Images

A Neuroscientist Explores The Biology Of Addiction In 'Never Enough'

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New recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force call for doctors to identify patients at risk of depression during pregnancy or after childbirth and refer them to counseling. Adene Sanchez/Getty Images hide caption

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To Prevent Pregnancy-Related Depression, At-Risk Women Advised To Get Counseling

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Hinterhaus Productions/Getty Images

The 'Strange Science' Behind The Big Business Of Exercise Recovery

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