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Celeste Thompson, 57, a home care worker in Missoula, Mont., examines a pill bottle in her home. Thompson cares for her husband, and worries that if she loses her Medicaid coverage she won't be able to afford to see a doctor. Mike Albans for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Mike Albans for Kaiser Health News

A well-regarded intensive care doctor in Virginia says he has had good success in treating 150 sepsis patients with a mix of IV corticosteroids, vitamin C and vitamin B, along with careful management of fluids. Other doctors want more proof — the sort that comes only via more rigorous tests. Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Why The Newly Proposed Sepsis Treatment Needs More Study

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Bill Kochevar received an implanted brain-recording and muscle-stimulating system that allowed him to move limbs he hadn't been able to move in eight years. Cleveland FES Center hide caption

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Cleveland FES Center

Paralyzed Man Uses Thoughts To Control His Own Arm And Hand

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The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force says there is not enough evidence to determine whether testing people with no symptoms of celiac disease provides any benefit for those patients. Andrew Brookes/Cultura RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Brookes/Cultura RF/Getty Images

No Need To Get Screened For Celiac Unless You Have Symptoms, Panel Says

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State and federal policies now limit the use of lead in gasoline, paint and plumbing, but children can still ingest the metal through contaminated soil. The effects of even fairly small amounts can be long-lasting, the evidence suggests. Christin Lola/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Christin Lola/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Childhood Exposure To Lead Can Blunt IQ For Decades, Study Suggests

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Kathleen helps her son Gideon get his glasses on. Part of Gideon's brain was damaged during development, which effects his vision. Caitlin O'Hara for NPR hide caption

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Caitlin O'Hara for NPR

For Gideon, Infection With a Common Virus Caused Rare Birth Defects

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There's overwhelming consensus that breast-feeding is the optimal way to feed an infant. But the topic of how breast-feeding may influence cognitive ability is controversial. Guerilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Guerilla/Getty Images

Breast-Fed Kids May Be Less Hyper, But Not Necessarily Smarter, Study Finds

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Twins Ryan and Nell Stimpert lie in their baby boxes at home in Cleveland. The cardboard boxes are safe and portable places for the babies to sleep. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

What Does Failed Repeal Of Affordable Care Act Mean For Current Health Care Law?

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Dr. Cesar Barba (right), a family physician at the UMMA Community Clinic's Fremont Wellness Center in South Los Angeles, treats Lourdes Flores Valdez, 42, for her diabetes and other health issues. Maya Sugarman/KPCC hide caption

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Maya Sugarman/KPCC

Dr. Paul Turek, a urologist with clinics in San Francisco and Beverly Hills, says one group of friends who got vasectomies together, during the NCAA spring basketball tournament, seemed to recover more quickly than usual, and require fewer pain pills. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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April Dembosky/KQED

March Madness Vasectomies Encourage Guys To Take One For The Team

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House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas, says the latest version of the GOP bill would let states decide on required benefits. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP