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In her new book, Barbara Lipska describes surviving cancer that had spread to her brain, and how the illness changed her cognition, character and, ultimately, her understanding of the mental illnesses she studies. Courtesy of the author hide caption

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Courtesy of the author

'The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind' Returns From Madness

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Sara Wong for NPR

Invisibilia: Do the Patterns in Your Past Predict Your Future?

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Arlington, Mass., Police Chief Fred Ryan (right) and Inspector Gina Bassett review toxicology reports on cocaine evidence looking for the possibility of fentanyl. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Fentanyl-Laced Cocaine Becoming A Deadly Problem Among Drug Users

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The author of a new book, Doing Harm, argues that a pattern of gender bias in medicine means women's pain may be going undiagnosed. PhotoAlto/Michele Constantini/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoAlto/Michele Constantini/Getty Images

How 'Bad Medicine' Dismisses And Misdiagnoses Women's Symptoms

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Birth Control Apps Find A Big Market In 'Contraception Deserts'

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When patients connect online, they often share information that reveals how treatments work in the real world. Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Samples of blood and other bodily fluids at the coroner's office in Marion County, Ind., are tested for controlled substances. Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media
Sara Wong for NPR

Invisibilia: We All Think We Know The People We Love. We're All Deluded

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In 2014, Kaiser Health News' Jenny Gold interviewed patients getting blood tests from Theranos at a Walgreens in Palo Alto, Calif., until a fire alarm stopped everything. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP