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Oily fish such as salmon, sardines and lake trout, as well as some plant sources such as walnuts and flaxseed, can be good, tasty sources of omega-3 fatty acids. MinoruM/Getty Images hide caption

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MinoruM/Getty Images

Eating Fish May Help City Kids With Asthma Breathe Better

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Female mosquitoes searching for a meal of blood detect people partly by using a special olfactory receptor to home in on our sweat. Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images

How Mosquitoes Sniff Out Human Sweat To Find Us

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Just a 10 percent shift in the salt concentration of your blood would make you very sick. To keep that from happening, the body has developed a finely tuned physiological circuit that includes information about that and a beverage's saltiness, to know when to signal thirst. Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images hide caption

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Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images

Blech! Brain Science Explains Why You're Not Thirsty For Salt Water

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A female adult head louse clings to a hair plucked from a human scalp. The brown line visible inside the insect, on the left side of its body, is its last blood meal. Lice typically eat a few times a day. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

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Josh Cassidy/KQED

After a sports injury, Esteban Serrano owed $829.41 for a knee brace purchased with insurance through his doctor's office. He says he found the same kind of brace selling for less than $250 online. Paula Andalo/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Paula Andalo/Kaiser Health News

Soccer-Playing Engineer Calls Foul On Pricey Knee Brace

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Scientists are questioning the evidence about an alleged attack on diplomats at the U.S. Embassy in Havana. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Doubts Rise About Evidence That U.S. Diplomats In Cuba Were Attacked

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A 20-minute nap refreshes. Just don't sleep in so long on Sunday morning that you find it hard to fall asleep Sunday night. Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images hide caption

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Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images

Nappuccinos To Weekend Z's: Strategize To Catch Up On Lost Sleep

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Various forms of dementia can take very different courses, so it's important to get the right diagnosis. Mehau Kulyk/Science Source hide caption

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Mehau Kulyk/Science Source

Is It Alzheimer's Or Another Dementia? The Right Answer Matters

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For people with a rare condition known as misophonia, certain sounds like slurping, chewing, tapping and clicking can elicit intense feelings of rage or panic. Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Misophonia: When Life's Noises Drive You Mad

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A study found that consuming two eggs per day was linked to a 27 percent higher risk of developing heart disease. But many experts say this new finding is no justification to drop eggs from your diet. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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