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Mammography has helped increase the early detection of breast tumors. Now, researchers say, the goal is to discern which of those tumors need aggressive treatment, including chemotherapy or radiation after surgery. Chicago Tribune/Getty Images hide caption

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Chicago Tribune/Getty Images

Tumor Test Helps Identify Which Breast Cancers Don't Require Extra Treatment

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Patients who underwent genetic screenings now fear that documentation of the results in their medical records could lead to problems if a new health law is enacted. Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images

A comprehensive study of air pollution in the U.S. finds it still kills thousands a year, and disproportionately affects poor people and minorities. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

U.S. Air Pollution Still Kills Thousands Every Year, Study Concludes

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The ongoing debate over health care has many people wondering how changes will affect their coverage. Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images hide caption

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Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images

Q&A: What Does The Senate Health Bill Mean For Me?

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San Francisco lactation counselor Caroline Kerhervé — with kids of her clients — during a weekly session of a new mothers' group she coached in May. Courtesy of Caroline Kerherve hide caption

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Courtesy of Caroline Kerherve

Medicaid pays the costs for about 62 percent of seniors who are living in nursing homes, some of the priciest health care available. Tomas Rodriguez/Getty Images/Picture Press RM hide caption

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Tomas Rodriguez/Getty Images/Picture Press RM

Whole genome sequencing could become part of routine medical care. Researchers sought to find out how primary care doctors and patients would handle the results. Cultura RM Exclusive/GIPhotoStock/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive hide caption

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Cultura RM Exclusive/GIPhotoStock/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive

Routine DNA Sequencing May Be Helpful And Not As Scary As Feared

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(From left) Mothers from Namibia's Himba tribe; from Amber, India; and from Washington state. Jose Luis Trisan/Getty; Hadynyah/Getty; Sarah Wolfe Photography/Getty hide caption

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Jose Luis Trisan/Getty; Hadynyah/Getty; Sarah Wolfe Photography/Getty

Secrets Of Breast-Feeding From Global Moms In The Know

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Greg unwinds a hose while doing some yardwork. Along with his failing memory, Greg has been experiencing secondary symptoms including paranoia, depression and slow healing. Amanda Kowalski for NPR hide caption

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Amanda Kowalski for NPR

More Than Memory: Coping With The Other Ills Of Alzheimer's

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Women have gotten conflicting advice from doctors about when to have mammograms. Amelie Benoist/Science Source hide caption

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Amelie Benoist/Science Source

OB-GYNs Give Women More Say In When They Have Mammograms

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell leaves the chamber after announcing the release of the Republicans' health care bill on Thursday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

CHART: Who Wins, Who Loses With Senate Health Care Bill

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