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"This is the next important step in the Administration's work to end foreign freeloading and put American patients first," Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said in a statement detailing the plan. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Airway-irritating acetals seem to form in some types of vape juice even without heat, researchers find — likely a reaction between the alcohol and aldehydes in the liquid. Gabby Jones/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Gabby Jones/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Gray was diagnosed with sickle cell disease when she was an infant. She was considering a bone marrow transplant when she heard about the CRISPR study and jumped at the chance to volunteer. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

In A 1st, Doctors In U.S. Use CRISPR Tool To Treat Patient With Genetic Disorder

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The mood boost of talking to strangers may seem fleeting, but the research on well-being, scientists say, suggests that a happy life is made up of a high frequency of positive events. Even small positive experiences — chatting with a stranger in an elevator — can make a difference. Olivia Falcigno/NPR hide caption

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Olivia Falcigno/NPR

Sleep scientists say the power of a warm bedtime bath to trigger sleepiness likely has to do, paradoxically, with cooling the body's core temperature. PhotoTalk/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoTalk/Getty Images

Overall in medical research, the proportion of participants with non-European ancestry is only about 20 percent, says Columbia University bioethicist Sandra Soo-Jin Lee. And that's a problem. Tek Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Tek Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Different parts of the brain aren't always in the same stage of sleep at the same time, notes neurologist and author Guy Leschziner. When this happens, an individual might order a pizza or go out for a drive — while technically still being fast asleep. Frederic Cirou/PhotoAlto/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic Cirou/PhotoAlto/Getty Images

From Insomnia To Sexsomnia, Unlocking The 'Secret World' Of Sleep

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Sovereign Valentine and his wife, Jessica, wait as a dialysis machine filters his blood. Before finding a dialysis clinic in their insurance network, the Valentines were charged more than a half-million dollars for 14 weeks of treatment. Tommy Martino/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Tommy Martino/Kaiser Health News

First Came Kidney Failure. Then There Was The $540,842 Bill For Dialysis

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Steve Wickham, at home in Grundy County, Tenn., has developed an educational seminar with his wife, and fellow nurse, Karen, that they are using to help people with Type II diabetes bring blood sugar under control with less reliance on drugs. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

2 Nurses In Tennessee Preach 'Diabetes Reversal'

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We all walk around the world thinking of ourselves as individuals. But in this short animation, NPR's Invisibilia explores some of the ways in which we're all invisibly connected to one another. Lily Padula for NPR hide caption

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Lily Padula for NPR

How Microexpressions Can Make Moods Contagious

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Choosing a surgeon can be tricky. It starts with making sure you really need the surgery, and then finding an experienced specialist you can trust. Morsa Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Morsa Images/Getty Images

A federally funded study is testing aerobic exercise as a way to prevent the development of Alzheimer's disease. Stewart Cohen/Getty Images hide caption

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Stewart Cohen/Getty Images

Is Aerobic Exercise The Right Prescription For Staving Off Alzheimer's?

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Tom Merton/Caiaimage/Getty Images

Researchers Explore Why Women's Alzheimer's Risk Is Higher Than Men's

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Bacteria (purple) in the bloodstream can trigger sepsis, a life-threatening illness. Steve Gschmeissner/ScienceSource hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/ScienceSource

Regulations That Mandate Sepsis Care Appear To Have Worked In New York

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