Your Health News and commentary about personal health, medicine, healthcare, drugs, diet, recipes, and nutrition. Download the Your Health podcast and subscribe to our RSS feed.

Flooded houses near Lake Houston on Aug. 30, after the storm called Harvey swept through. Sociologist Clare Cooper Marcus says our homes hold our emotional history — our memories, our hopes, our dreams and pain. In some ways our homes are who we are. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Brandi Chastain celebrates after scoring the winning goal of the 1999 World Cup. Hector Mata/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Hector Mata/AFP/Getty Images

40 Years Of Athletic Support: Happy Anniversary To The Sports Bra

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/554476966/554601032" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mothers helping other mothers through the challenges of postpartum depression and anxiety makes Florida's mentoring program unique. Veronica Grech/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Veronica Grech/Getty Images

Piper Su, seen here with her son, Elliot, lives in Alexandria, Va. She has registered with several transplant centers in hopes of increasing the odds of getting an organ. Courtesy of Piper Su hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Piper Su

Searching For A Fairer Way To Distribute Donor Livers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/549224583/553662037" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Today's college students aren't necessarily having more sex than previous generations, but the culture that permeates hookups on campus has changed. Mark Peterson/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Peterson/Corbis via Getty Images

Hookup Culture: The Unspoken Rules Of Sex On College Campuses

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/552582404/553776318" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., continues to tweak the health care bill he cosponsors in an effort to persuade reluctant senators to back it. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists calls the flu vaccine an "essential" part of prenatal care, for protection of the newborn as well as the woman. Infants typically don't get their own flu shot until age 6 months or later. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Pregnant Women Should Still Get The Flu Vaccine, Doctors Advise

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/552668449/553405861" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Food allergies are tricky to diagnose, and many kids can outgrow them, too. A test called an oral food challenge is the gold standard to rule out an allergy. It's performed under medical supervision. Michelle Kondrich for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Michelle Kondrich for NPR

This Test Can Determine Whether You've Outgrown A Food Allergy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/552959006/553405867" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Two-year-old Robbie Klein of West Roxbury, Mass., has hemophilia, a medical condition that interferes with his blood's ability to clot normally. His parents, both teachers, worry that his condition could make it hard for them to get insurance to cover his expensive medications if the law changes. Jesse Costa/Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Jesse Costa/Jesse Costa/WBUR

Harrison Browne, seen here playing for the Buffalo Beauts, says he feels lucky to be part of a league that accepts him and wants him to feel comfortable. Courtesy of the National Women's Hockey League hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the National Women's Hockey League

Cancer Patient Says Condition Will Dictate Life Choices With ACA Repeal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/553204529/553205303" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Charlene Yurgaitis gets health insurance through Medicaid in Pennsylvania. It covers the counseling and medication she and her doctors say she needs to recover from her opioid addiction. Ben Allen/WITF hide caption

toggle caption
Ben Allen/WITF

Sen. Lindsey Graham, second from left, speaks as Sen. John Barrasso, from left, Sen. Bill Cassidy, Sen. John Thune and Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell listen during a news briefing Tuesday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images