Your Money NPR coverage of personal finance, money, investing, taxes, retirement, mortgages and housing markets, wealth management, and stock market news. Download NPR podcasts and RSS feeds.

Your Money

COVINGTON, KY - APRIL 8: Kathleen Malone works on tax returns at the Cincinnati Internal Revenue Service Center April 8, 2005 in Covington, Kentucky. The tax filing deadline is a week away. Mike Simons/Getty hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Simons/Getty

TikTok is filled with tax advice. Is any of it worth listening to?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197958760/1244490476" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The U.S. market for domestic mail delivery is by far the largest in the world, and a recent report found its prices are very low compared to other developed countries. The U.S. Postal Service said this week that it wants to raise rates in July. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The Forever Stamp is forever rising in price. How does the U.S. cost compare globally?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1244273973/1244583212" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona participates in an event at Dartmouth College in January. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Steven Senne/AP

Biden seeks student debt relief for millions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1243071907/1243347245" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Apple Pay app on an iPhone in New York. Consumers tend to spend about 10% more when they adopt mobile contactless payment methods, a researcher says. Jenny Kane/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jenny Kane/AP

Using your phone to pay is convenient, but it can also mean you spend more

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1241841908/1243294365" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A sold sign stands outside a home in Wyndmoor, Pa., on June 22, 2022. Two recent studies suggest that prospective homeowners will have to earn more than $100,000 annually to afford a typical home in much of the U.S. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Rourke/AP

Israeli soldiers are seen near the Gaza Strip border in southern Israel, Monday, March 4, 2024. Ohad Zwigenberg/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ohad Zwigenberg/AP

How much of your tax dollars are going to Israel and Ukraine

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197958571/1241644605" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Visa and MasterCard announced, Tuesday, March 26, 2024, a settlement with U.S. merchants related to swipe fees, a development that could potentially save consumers tens of billions of dollars. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Lennihan/AP
Reina Takahashi for NPR

What is the new etiquette for tipping?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1196978930/1241773187" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The IRS is warning taxpayers that they may be leaving more than $1 billion on the table. The federal tax collector said Monday, March 25, 2024, that roughly 940,000 people in the U.S. have until May 17 to submit tax returns for unclaimed refunds for tax year 2020. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Lennihan/AP

The cereal aisle at a store in San Rafael, California. Manufacturers have been using "shrinkflation" techniques for years, but in the midst of inflation and higher food prices, the practice is being scrutinized and politicians are calling it out. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

You're Not Imagining It; Shrinkflation Is Real

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198910739/1238422481" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Norwegian supermarket chain REMA 1000 uses dynamic pricing for all the items in its stores, including Kvikk Lunsj chocolate bars and Solo soda. Jessica Robinson/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jessica Robinson/NPR

Is dynamic pricing coming to a supermarket near you?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197958433/1236454900" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Biden convened his Competition Council at the White House on March 5 after his administration announced new actions to cap credit card late fees at $8, compared with $32. Nathan Howard/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nathan Howard/Getty Images

Taking on junk fees is popular. But can it win Biden more voters?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1235955054/1236396125" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau capped credit card late fees as part of the Biden administration fight against junk fees. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Ezra Croft from North Carolina saw his annual homeowners' insurance surge to $1,600, a $700 increase. Many others across the country are also seeing surging auto and home insurance premiums. Courtesy of Ezra Croft hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Ezra Croft

'Everything is rising at a scary rate': Why car and home insurance costs are surging

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1233963377/1235305972" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Rohit Chopra, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, is working toward regulation to remove medical bills from consumer credit reports. Michael A. McCoy/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael A. McCoy/Getty Images

Why a financial regulator is going after health care debt

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1234998635/1235137216" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thin Mints and Samoas are perennial bestselling Girl Scout Cookies, but Adventurefuls, Lemon-ups and Do-si-Do cookies also have die-hard fans. Bill Chappell/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Bill Chappell/NPR

Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona answers questions during the daily briefing at the White House Aug. 5, 2021, in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Student loan balances wiped for the first batch of borrowers in Biden's SAVE plan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1232818472/1232827311" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

More people are using Buy Now, Pay Later services like they might a credit card — frequently and on everything. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

How do you use Buy Now, Pay Later? It likely depends on your credit score

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1231514249/1231514250" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript