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Lessons from a former drug dealer

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Kevin Dole works from home next to his wife's bureau and near his drum set in the couple's small two-bedroom condo in Nashville, Tennessee. Chelsea Fitzgerald-Dole hide caption

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Chelsea Fitzgerald-Dole

Home prices could fall in some U.S. cities. Here's where and why

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A gas pump is seen in a station on Feb. 1 in Houston. Gasoline prices hit a new national record, not adjusted for inflation, surpassing the previous peak set around two months ago. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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An electric vehicle gets its battery recharged at a charge station in San Francisco on March 9. The Biden administration is spending $5 billion to build a network of chargers in a bid to get more people to buy electric cars. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

How the U.S. wants to make charging electric cars (almost) as painless as pumping gas

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Claudia and Jesús Fierro of Yuma, Ariz., review their medical bills. They pay $1,000 a month for health insurance yet still owed more than $7,000 after two episodes of care at the local hospital. Lisa Hornak for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Lisa Hornak for Kaiser Health News

Hit with $7,146 for two hospital bills, a family sought health care in Mexico

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A Bitcoin logo is displayed on an ATM in Hong Kong in 2017. More workers may soon be able to stake some of their 401(k) retirement savings to bitcoin. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

A U.S. Postal Service truck drives in Philadelphia. The service is about to set longer delivery standards for first-class packages, in a move that its regulator says will not have a big effect on its finances. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP
LA Johnson/NPR

Student loan borrowers will get help after an NPR report and years of complaints

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Marisela Orozco (foreground) is letting her sister, Marissa, live in the house she thought she would own after making almost four years of payments. But the owner disappeared, along with the title, and she worries he may return and evict them. Laura Ziegler / KCUR 89.3 hide caption

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Laura Ziegler / KCUR 89.3

Millions of Americans are resorting to risky ways to buy an affordable home

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Mortgage rates on 30-year, fixed-rate loans rose above 5% this week. That's pushing the cost of buying a home higher and making homeownership unaffordable for more people. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Mortgage rates just hit 5%. Here's how much more expensive that makes home ownership

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U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona delivers remarks in Washington, D.C., in January. The department has extended the freeze on federal student loan payments several times since the pandemic began in March 2020. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images