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A 2011 Subaru Legacy is among the nine vehicles that were found to have a driver fatality rate of zero in a new report by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Daniel Acker/Landov hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Landov

Antoine Walker took a lot of 3-point shots during his NBA career, despite hitting them at a subpar rate. He also went bankrupt two years after retiring, despite collecting $110 million in salary during his playing career. Jim Bourg/Reuters/Corbis hide caption

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Jim Bourg/Reuters/Corbis

Auto dealers are extending loans to a growing number of people with weak credit. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Auto Loan Surge Fuels Fears Of Another Subprime Crisis

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Lou Graham prepares taxes in Connecticut and is ready to answer client questions about the Affordable Care Act. Jeff Cohen/WNPR hide caption

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Jeff Cohen/WNPR

Tax Preparers Get Ready To Be Bearers Of Bad News About Health Law

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When Ed Neufeldt introduced President Obama in 2009, Elkhart, Ind. had the dubious distinction of having the highest unemployment rate in the country, close to 20 percent. The county's job numbers have recovered, but Neufeldt's now working three part-time jobs. Tamara Keith/NPR hide caption

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Tamara Keith/NPR

Working 3 Jobs In A Time Of Recovery

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A trader stands outside the New York Stock Exchange on Oct. 31, 2012. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

Markets May Stumble Or Skyrocket, But This Economist Says Hold On Tight

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President Obama discussed the need for paid sick leave with women at Charmington's Cafe in Baltimore Thursday. With him are Vika Jordan (from left), Amanda Rothschild and Mary Stein. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

A sign announces that a Los Angeles house is for sale in November. Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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Richard Vogel/AP

Consumer Agency Launches Tool To Help You Find A Cheaper Mortgage

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A protester demonstrates for higher wages for fast food workers in Jackson, Miss., in December. Employers are hiring more people, but overall, the wages they're paying remain flat. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Employment Is Up. Paychecks, Not So Much

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