Your Money NPR coverage of personal finance, money, investing, taxes, retirement, mortgages and housing markets, wealth management, and stock market news. Download NPR podcasts and RSS feeds.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., in December. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Education Dept. Unveils Fix For Student Loan Program's 'Bureaucratic Nightmare'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/801367031/802560155" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Democratic senators are demanding that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, led by Kathleen Kraninger, do its job supervising the student loan system. Alex Wroblewski/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wroblewski/Reuters

Roughly 40 million Americans are likely to see their credit scores drop by 20 points or more. An equal number should go up by as much. courtneyk/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
courtneyk/Getty Images

FICO Is About To Change Credit Scores. Here's Why It Matters

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/800563459/802392435" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The phone of Jeff Bezos allegedly was hacked via a WhatsApp account held by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. Bandar Algaloud/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bandar Algaloud/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Don't Be Like Jeff Bezos. Here's How To Keep Your Phone Safe From Hackers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/798630195/799629337" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Many Americans who get overwhelmed by student loan debt are told that student debt can't be erased through bankruptcy. Now more judges and lawyers say that's a myth and bankruptcy can help. Mitch Blunt/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mitch Blunt/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Myth Busted: Turns Out Bankruptcy Can Wipe Out Student Loan Debt After All

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/797330613/798468526" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

What if our economy is built not on traditional theories of rational behavior, but on narratives and psychology? sesame/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
sesame/Getty Images

The Story Of Money: How Human Behavior Shapes Economies — And Vice Versa

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/798140390/798170118" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Generics may not have the same cost-lowering power for specialty medicines, such as multiple sclerosis drugs, researchers find. That's true especially when other brand-name drugs are approved to treat a given disease before the first generic is approved. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Alipay and WeChat QR codes for online payment are displayed at a vegetable stall in Nantong in China's eastern Jiangsu province. Now China's central bank is preparing to test a digital currency. STR/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
STR/AFP via Getty Images

China To Test Digital Currency. Could It End Up Challenging The Dollar Globally?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/795988512/795995614" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Secure Act aims to make it easier for small employers to offer retirement benefits. But some analysts say the new law doesn't go far enough because it's optional and doesn't apply to gig workers. Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

New Law Aims To Help Americans Without Retirement Plans. Will It Work?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/794619987/795514914" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Airport employees, Uber and Lyft drivers, and other workers protest for a $15 minimum wage at Los Angeles International Airport in October. Increases in minimum wages contributed to bigger pay gains for lower-income workers. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Minimum Wage Hikes Fuel Higher Pay Growth For Those At The Bottom

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/794280616/794816823" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The S&P 500 has seen a nearly fivefold increase since the depths of the Great Recession. It has gone up nearly 30% this year alone. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A Decade After A Fearful Market Hit Bottom, Stock Bulls Continue Historic Run

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/791784329/792302194" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An image of Ow Luen from his file, originally held at the USCIS, now available at the National Archives. Grant Din/National Archives hide caption

toggle caption
Grant Din/National Archives

Tracing Your Family's Roots May Soon Get A Lot More Expensive

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/791524913/792160330" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Ultimate Procrastinator's Guide To Gifts

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/791274084/791274085" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Families affected by preexisting medical conditions attend a Capitol Hill news conference in 2018 in support of the Affordable Care Act. Prior to the ACA, insurers could refuse to cover people who had even mild preexisting conditions — or charge them much more. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP