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Laura Hart says that if she had gotten a five-year loan instead of a seven-year loan, she wouldn't have let the dealer talk her into buying an extended warranty, and maybe she would have bought a less expensive car. Courtesy of Laura Hart hide caption

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Courtesy of Laura Hart

The 7-Year Car Loan: Watch Your Wallet

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Nearly two-dozen U.S. senators are calling on Kathleen Kraninger, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, to investigate a loan servicer called the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

23 Senators Demand Investigation Into Mismanagement Of Student Loan Program

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90 Years After Black Tuesday, What Are The Lessons For Today's Investors?

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Itzel Alarcon recently moved into a rental development near Denver. She says she's renting for now because she saw relatives hurt by the housing crash and is worried that home values might drop again. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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Renters Only: These New Homes Aren't For Sale

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Bob Orozco, 89, has been in fitness his entire adult life. He began working for the Laguna Niguel YMCA in 1984 and leads the Silver Sneakers Club, a free fitness program for Medicare beneficiaries. "I probably will work until something stops me," Orozco says. Morgan Baker for NPR hide caption

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Morgan Baker for NPR

A long-awaited update to federal overtime rules means about 1.3 million workers will be entitled to extra pay when they work more than 40 hours a week. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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1.3 Million More Workers Eligible For Overtime Pay, But Some Say Rules Fall Short

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Stefan Krasowski, co-founder of the Reach For The Miles meetup, stands in front of Krak des Chevaliers in western Syria. The war-torn country was the last one that Krasowski, who has since turned 40, had yet to visit. Stefan Krasowski/Rapid Travel Chai hide caption

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Stefan Krasowski/Rapid Travel Chai

How One Man Used Miles To Fulfill His Dream To Visit Every Country Before Turning 40

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Cameron and Katlynn Fischer celebrated their April wedding in Colorado. But the day before, Cameron was in such bad shape from a bachelor party hangover that he headed to an emergency room to be rehydrated. That's when their financial headaches began. Courtesy of Cameron Fischer hide caption

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Courtesy of Cameron Fischer
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Colleges Could Do More To Help Student Parents Pay For Child Care, Watchdog Says

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Report: Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program Hasn't Fixed Its Issues

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Groupon and other deal sites are the latest marketing tactic in medicine, offering bargain prices for services such as CT scans. Colin Cuthbert/Science Photo Libra/Getty Images hide caption

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