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Stacey Abrams speaks during a church service in Norfolk, Va., on Oct. 17. A political organization led by the Democrat is branching out into paying off medical debts. Fair Fight Action said it's donating $1.34 million from its political action committee to wipe out debt owed by 108,000 people in Georgia, Arizona, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

When Caitlin Wells Salerno and Jon Salerno's first son, Hank, was born, his delivery cost the family only $30. Gus' bill came in at more than $16,000, all told — including the $2,755 ER charge. The family was responsible for about $3,600 of the total. Rae Ellen Bichell/KHN hide caption

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Rae Ellen Bichell/KHN

A hospital hiked the price of a routine childbirth by calling it an 'emergency'

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Los Angeles International Airport and SoFi Stadium employers spoke with potential job applicants at a job fair in Inglewood, Calif., in September. About 19% of all households in an NPR poll say they lost all their savings during the COVID-19 outbreak, and have none to fall back on. PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images

Black and Latino families continue to bear pandemic's great economic toll in U.S.

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Erica Cuellar, her husband and her daughter moved in with her father in his home early in the pandemic, after she lost her job. She and her husband were worried they wouldn't be able to afford the rent on their house in Houston with only one income. In July 2020, the whole family tested positive for the coronavirus. Michael Starghill for NPR hide caption

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Michael Starghill for NPR

Akira Johnson has been facing eviction because her landlord would not accept payment from South Carolina's rent and utility assistance program. Cameron Pollack for NPR hide caption

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Cameron Pollack for NPR

Why rent help from Congress has been so damn slow getting to people who need it

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"Borrowers who devote a decade of their lives to public service should be able to rely on the promise of Public Service Loan Forgiveness," U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona said on Wednesday. Joshua Roberts/Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Roberts/Getty Images

Biden's proposal to give IRS more info on bank accounts faces criticism

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Travis Warner of Dallas got tested for the coronavirus at a free-standing emergency room in June 2020 after one of his colleagues tested positive for the virus. The emergency room bill included a $54,000 charge for one test. Laura Buckman for KHN hide caption

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Laura Buckman for KHN

The Bill For His COVID Test In Texas Was A Whopping $54,000

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A supporter of pop star Britney Spears participating in a #FreeBritney rally on July 14 in Washington, D.C. When anyone poses a high risk of harm to themselves or others, psychiatrists are obligated to hospitalize them, even against their will. For many patients, paying for that involuntary care leads to long-term financial strain. Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Spinning on the hamster wheel allows Mr. Goxx to select a cryptocurrency to trade. Choosing one of two tunnels to run through allows him to buy or sell. YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

A community of young investors on TikTok, including @ceowatchlist, @quicktrades and @irisapp, are using House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's stock trading disclosures as inspiration for where to invest themselves. One user called Pelosi the market's "biggest whale," while another called her the "queen of investing." @ceowatchlist; @quicktrades; @irisapp/TikTok hide caption

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@ceowatchlist; @quicktrades; @irisapp/TikTok

TikTokers Are Trading Stocks By Copying What Members Of Congress Do

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Homeownership is the most common way Americans build wealth over their lifetimes. Amanda Voisard for The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Amanda Voisard for The Washington Post via Getty Images

A New Housing Regulator Could Make The American Dream More Accessible For Millions

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