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Housing activists gather in Swampscott, Mass., in October to call on the state's governor to support more robust protections against evictions and foreclosures during the pandemic. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

More Americans Pay Rent On Credit Cards As Lawmakers Fail To Pass Relief Bill

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An error at the IRS caused thousands of non-Americans living overseas to mistakenly receive $1,200 stimulus checks last spring. Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images

IRS Says Its Own Error Sent $1,200 Stimulus Checks To Non-Americans Overseas

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The pandemic shuttered day-care centers, after-school programs and camps this year, creating problems for some parents who put aside wages, pre-tax, to pay for those expenses. Lars Baron/Getty Images hide caption

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Lars Baron/Getty Images

Use It Or Lose It: Parents Set Wages Aside For Child Care. Now It's At Risk

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A for sale sign is displayed in front of a house in Westwood, Mass. Home prices hit a new record in October as the number of homes for sale hit an all-time low. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Under President Trump, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau weakened a rule that aimed to protect people who get payday loans. Consumer advocates say they are looking forward to a Biden administration strengthening the agency. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Financial Watchdog Expected To Get Its Teeth Back Under Biden

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John and Mary Jane Forr stand outside their home in Punta Gorda, Fla. Forr, a retired Marine Corps colonel, discovered he could save $2,500 a year by shopping around for a lower-rate mortgage. Eve Edelheit for NPR hide caption

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Eve Edelheit for NPR

Their Service Entitles Them To Low-Cost Loans. But Veterans Often Pay More

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A pre-pandemic Seattle supermarket boasts row after row of prepackaged snacks. Even before the coronavirus pandemic put extra stress on grocery workers, keeping shelves stocked with the variety that Americans have come to expect took a hidden toll on producers, distributors and retail workers, says author Benjamin Lorr. David Ryder/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Ordway inside the mill building in Dover, N.H., where his restaurant Dos Mexican Eats is located. In late July, the state told him he had to return nearly $12,000 in unemployment benefits. Todd Bookman/NHPR hide caption

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Todd Bookman/NHPR

States Demand Refunds For Unemployment Money Paid In Error

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Nicole Xu for NPR

The American Government Once Offered Widely Affordable Child Care ... 77 Years Ago

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The number of women in the workforce overtook men for a brief period earlier this year. But the uncomfortable truth is that in their homes, women are still fitting into stereotypical roles of doing the bulk of cooking, cleaning and parenting. It's another form of systemic inequality within a 21st century home that the pandemic is laying bare. Malte Mueller/fStop/Getty Images hide caption

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Malte Mueller/fStop/Getty Images

Ellen Griffin is a single mom with two kids in Birmingham, Ala. Tamika Moore for NPR hide caption

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Tamika Moore for NPR

'Incredibly Scary': Single Moms Fear Falling Through Holes In Pandemic Safety Net

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Open enrollment is about to start for those buying private insurance off state or federal exchanges. PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images hide caption

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