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A protester holds up an eviction-related sign in Washington, D.C. The coronavirus rescue package just passed in Congress sets aside $25 billion for rental assistance and extends a CDC order aimed at preventing evictions. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

COVID-19 Relief Bill Could Stave Off Historic Wave Of Evictions

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Jaleesa Garland, a newcomer to Tulsa, Okla., after being accepted into the Tulsa Remote program. September Dawn Bottoms for NPR hide caption

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September Dawn Bottoms for NPR

You Want To Move? Some Cities Will Pay You $10,000 To Relocate

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President Trump speaks in April about the Paycheck Protection Program. From left are Jovita Carranza, head of the Small Business Administration; Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin; and adviser Ivanka Trump. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Scores Of Private Charitable Foundations Got Paycheck Protection Program Money

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Courtesy of TED

Elizabeth White: How Have This Century's Financial Crises Affected Older Adults?

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Education Secretary Betsy DeVos appears in Phoenix in October. On Friday, the Education Department announced an extension of pandemic relief measures for federal student loan borrowers. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

Education Department Extends Student Loan Payment Freeze Through January

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All health plans sold on HealthCare.Gov or one of state insurance exchanges are governed by Affordable Care Act rules. That means they have to provide comprehensive benefits to all applicants, regardless of their health or "preexisting conditions." But short-term plans and many others aren't bound by such restrictions. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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Headaches, lung issues and ongoing, debilitating fatigue are just a few of the symptoms plaguing some "long hauler" COVID-19 patients for months or more after the initial fever and acute symptoms recede. Grace Cary/Getty Images hide caption

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Sen. Mark Warner speaks alongside a bipartisan group of lawmakers as they announce a proposal for a $908 billion coronavirus relief bill on Tuesday. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Millions Face Bitter Winter If Congress Fails To Extend Relief Programs

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Housing activists gather in Swampscott, Mass., in October to call on the state's governor to support more robust protections against evictions and foreclosures during the pandemic. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

More Americans Pay Rent On Credit Cards As Lawmakers Fail To Pass Relief Bill

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An error at the IRS caused thousands of non-Americans living overseas to mistakenly receive $1,200 stimulus checks last spring. Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images

IRS Says Its Own Error Sent $1,200 Stimulus Checks To Non-Americans Overseas

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The pandemic shuttered day-care centers, after-school programs and camps this year, creating problems for some parents who put aside wages, pre-tax, to pay for those expenses. Lars Baron/Getty Images hide caption

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Lars Baron/Getty Images

Use It Or Lose It: Parents Set Wages Aside For Child Care. Now It's At Risk

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A for sale sign is displayed in front of a house in Westwood, Mass. Home prices hit a new record in October as the number of homes for sale hit an all-time low. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Under President Trump, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau weakened a rule that aimed to protect people who get payday loans. Consumer advocates say they are looking forward to a Biden administration strengthening the agency. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Financial Watchdog Expected To Get Its Teeth Back Under Biden

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