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A constable posts an eviction order for nonpayment of rent in October in Phoenix. The CDC is extending an order aimed at preventing evictions. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

Emotions, Money, And What It Means To Be 'Financially Whole'

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Janice Chang for NPR and KHN

Her Doctor's Office Moved 1 Floor Up. Why Did Her Treatment Cost 10 Times More?

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2020 made moving a reality for millions of Americans. Some moved to be near family, others chose to pursue their pre-pandemic pipe dreams and move to distant locations in pursuit of a better lifestyle and a cheaper cost of living. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Unless the rules change soon, Stephanie Salazar-Rodriguez of Denver expects to spend more than $10,000 on health insurance premiums this year. That's after losing her job last month — which meant losing her employer's contribution to her health plan. Rachel Woolf/KHN hide caption

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Rachel Woolf/KHN

Rohit Chopra, Biden's pick to run the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, told lawmakers at a remote hearing, "the financial lives of millions of Americans are in ruin." He's pictured here at a hearing in 2019. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Biden's Financial Watchdogs Would Be Tougher Cops On The Beat

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A visual representation of the digital Cryptocurrency, Bitcoin. The digital currency's meteoric rise has minted millionaires and energized true believers around the world. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Bitcoin: Mother Of All Bubbles, Or Revolutionary Breakthrough

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"As Texans struggled to survive this winter storm, Griddy made the suffering even worse as it debited outrageous amounts each day," Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said as his office sued the company. Here, electrical lines run through a neighborhood in Austin during the recent winter storms. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Hofstra University student Divya Singh found herself beset by a double whammy of bills from two of the costliest kinds of institutions in America — colleges and hospitals. After experiencing anxiety when her family had trouble coming up with the money for her tuition, she sought counseling and ended up with a weeklong stay in a psychiatric hospital — and a resulting $3,413 bill. Jackie Molloy for KHN hide caption

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Jackie Molloy for KHN

College Tuition Sparked A Mental Health Crisis. Then The Hefty Hospital Bill Arrived

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Power lines near Houston on Feb. 16. Some Texas residents are facing enormous power bills after wholesale prices for electricity skyrocketed amid last week's massive grid failure. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Ordinary items such as bicycles or hair extensions are gaining symbolic significance as we use them to project to a time when we can finally use them with others or show them off. Kaz Fantone for NPR hide caption

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Kaz Fantone for NPR

A Bicycle. A Trip. Or Just Pants: The Things We Buy When Pining For Normal Times

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