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Anna Davis Abel, a graduate student studying creative writing at West Virginia University, couldn't get tested for COVID-19 until her doctor ruled out other possible illnesses. Rebecca Kiger for KHN hide caption

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Rebecca Kiger for KHN

COVID-19 Tests That Are Supposed To Be Free Can Ring Up Surprising Charges

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What Happened Today: Flyover Salute To Health Care Workers, Economy Questions

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How To Donate The Federal Relief Check

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Nevada resident Derek Reich lost his income as a freelance cameraman. He says his lender told him he'd have to make up any missed payments in a giant balloon payment he can't afford. Then he was told that if he didn't qualify for a better option, "you're going into foreclosure." So Reich says he's going to spend his 401(k) retirement money rather than get the help that Congress wanted him to have. Courtesy of Derek Reich hide caption

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Courtesy of Derek Reich

3.4 Million Homeowners Skip Payments. But Many Are Scared, Say Congress Needs To Act

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Despite recent changes in insurance policy, some patients say doctors and insurers are charging them upfront for video appointments and phone calls — not just copays but sometimes the entire cost of the visit, even if it's covered by insurance. sesame/Getty Images hide caption

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Listeners Make Plans For Their Federal Relief Money

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How To Get Estate Documents In Order During The Pandemic

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What Happened Today: New Aid Bill Passes Senate, Economy Questions

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Congress Reaches Deal On Expansion Of Emergency Funding

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When airlines cancel flights and offer no other options to get to your destination within a reasonable amount of time, they are legally obligated to offer a refund. Kay Fochtmann/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Kay Fochtmann/Getty Images/EyeEm

Airlines Offer Vouchers, Credits For Canceled Flights. Customers Want Cash

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Federal Relief Check Helps Some People Pay Late Bills

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Millions of homeowners have put their mortgage payments on pause amid the coronavirus crisis. "A lot of people are in distress," says Michael Fratantoni, chief economist at the Mortgage Bankers Association. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

"For Sale By Owner" and "Closed Due to Virus" signs are displayed in a storefront in Grosse Pointe Woods, Mich. on April 2, 2020. The coronavirus has triggered a stunning collapse in the U.S. workforce. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

Emergency medical technicians wheel a patient into the ER of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Emergency hospitalizations related to COViD-19 can be costly. Fine print in the HHS rules regarding the CARES Act seem to spare patients at least some of the financial pain. Stan Grossfeld/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Grossfeld/Boston Globe via Getty Images

What Happened Today: New Jobless Numbers, Unemployment Questions

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