Your Money NPR coverage of personal finance, money, investing, taxes, retirement, mortgages and housing markets, wealth management, and stock market news. Download NPR podcasts and RSS feeds.

Emily Knowles sits outside her apartment in Watertown, Mass. Knowles has some college credits but no degree and works as a quality assurance analyst at Ovia Health, a Boston-based digital company that serves people who are starting families. "This is something that I never thought would be possible," Knowles said. Meredith Nierman/GBH News hide caption

toggle caption
Meredith Nierman/GBH News

No College, No Problem. Some Employers Drop Degree Requirements To Diversify Staffs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/990274681/992122589" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A car accident in 2019 smashed six of Mark Gottlieb's teeth and severely damaged four vertebrae. The spinal surgery he needed as a result led to medical bills that exhausted the personal injury coverage in his auto insurance. Erica Seryhm Lee for KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Erica Seryhm Lee for KHN

Surprise: The Charge For His Spine Surgery After A Car Crash Topped $700,000

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/989209329/989797979" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Biden administration has opened up enrollment on all Affordable Care Act marketplaces, including on the federal insurance exchange, Healthcare.gov, until August. Many people will qualify for better or less expensive plans — or both. Healthcare.gov/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Healthcare.gov/Screenshot by NPR

Pro-union Amazon warehouse worker Jennifer Bates vows at a rally in Birmingham to keep fighting to unionize the Amazon Bessemer warehouse. Stephan Bisaha for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Stephan Bisaha for NPR

Big Union Loss At Amazon Warehouse Casts Shadow Over Labor Movement

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/988020972/988200913" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Barbara Gaught stands outside the home she's now renting in Billings, Mont., with her 5-year-old son, Blazen, and their dog, Arie. Gaught and her family were evicted from the mobile home they had owned outright and lived in for 16 years because they fell behind on 'lot rent' for the little plot of land under the mobile home. Louise Johns for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Louise Johns for NPR

Losing It All: Mobile Home Owners Evicted Over Small Debts During Pandemic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/986559295/987956455" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Netflix's New Show 'Marriage Or Mortgage' Reveals The Emotional Aspects Of Homebuying

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/984829990/984829991" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A constable posts an eviction order for nonpayment of rent in October in Phoenix. The CDC is extending an order aimed at preventing evictions. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images
Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

Emotions, Money, And What It Means To Be 'Financially Whole'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/981653888/982305026" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Janice Chang for NPR and KHN

Her Doctor's Office Moved 1 Floor Up. Why Did Her Treatment Cost 10 Times More?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/976112513/981722668" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

2020 made moving a reality for millions of Americans. Some moved to be near family, others chose to pursue their pre-pandemic pipe dreams and move to distant locations in pursuit of a better lifestyle and a cheaper cost of living. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Nicole Xu for NPR

Unless the rules change soon, Stephanie Salazar-Rodriguez of Denver expects to spend more than $10,000 on health insurance premiums this year. That's after losing her job last month — which meant losing her employer's contribution to her health plan. Rachel Woolf/KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Rachel Woolf/KHN

Rohit Chopra, Biden's pick to run the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, told lawmakers at a remote hearing, "the financial lives of millions of Americans are in ruin." He's pictured here at a hearing in 2019. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Susan Walsh/AP

Biden's Financial Watchdogs Would Be Tougher Cops On The Beat

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/972981169/973056183" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">