Your Money NPR coverage of personal finance, money, investing, taxes, retirement, mortgages and housing markets, wealth management, and stock market news. Download NPR podcasts and RSS feeds.

Marissa Lovell had hoped to buy her small Boise, Idaho, rental home until the price shot up by nearly $100,000 amid the coronavirus pandemic. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kirk Siegler/NPR

Homebuyers Squeezed As Western States See Prices Double Or More In Last Decade

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1000879058/1002018236" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A physical imitation of the Bitcoin cryptocurrency is pictured with a $1 bank note. Cryptocurrencies are plunging over a range of factors, including the spillover impact from falling stock markets and fears about increased regulations. Martin Bureau/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Martin Bureau/AFP via Getty Images

Bitcoin Is Plunging. What To Know About The Wild Ride In Cryptocurrencies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/998539706/998709258" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A record shortage of homes for sale and strong demand from buyers are sparking bidding wars and sending home prices to new records. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Sakuma/AP

It's Harder Than Ever To Buy A House, And Bidding Wars Keep Breaking Out

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/996600894/997983749" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Anchorage, Alaska, resident Hans Dow built his own sawmill and began milling his own boards after lumber prices skyrocketed over the past year. Emily Schwing for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Emily Schwing for NPR

As Lumber Prices Climb, DIYers Cut Out The Middle Man And Mill Their Own

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/996913329/997423085" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A screen shows canceled incoming flights at T.F. Green International Airport in Warwick, R.I., on March 30, 2020. Consumer advocates and two senators say airlines are sitting on nearly $15 billion in refunds owed to customers for canceled travel. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Complaints Soar As Customers Fight Airlines For Refunds From Pandemic Cancellations

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/996857812/996882338" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A bartender mixes a drink inside a bar last week in San Francisco. The latest retail sales data out on Friday showed an increase in sales at restaurants and bars as more people venture out amid the continued reopening of the U.S. economy. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Tia Cunningham says she was able to get out of subsidized housing and use the money as a down payment to buy a house. Imani Khayyam for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Imani Khayyam for NPR

More Cities Are Handing People Cash With No Strings Attached. Here's Why

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/994290664/994539621" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

People who need help getting to a vaccination site will be able to get free or discounted rides through Uber and Lyft, the White House says. Here, a woman receives her first dose of the Pfizer vaccine at a mass vaccination site in Aberdeen, Md., after getting a ride to the site from her landlord. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Stock trader Peter Tuchman works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on March 9, 2020. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

I Came Close To Dying: Wall Street's Most Photographed Man Is Ready For Normalcy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/994383760/995341056" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Right out of college Anita Ramaswamy was hired for her dream job as an analyst at a big bank on Wall Street. She frequently worked until midnight, including during the pandemic. Courtney Pedroza for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Courtney Pedroza for NPR

Protesters call for stronger eviction protections in January in Sacramento, Calif. A federal appeals court will now decide whether to scrap a federal eviction moratorium from the CDC. Housing groups say renters need more time to qualify for and get rental assistance money. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Judge Strikes Down Federal Eviction Moratorium, Setting Up High-Stakes Appeal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/993973765/994145547" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"The stock market is on fire," says Greg Valliere, chief U.S. policy strategist at AGF Investments. "It has astonished veteran observers, and it may have a ways to go." Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Biden Wants To Go Tough On Wall Street. The Response? The Best Rally Since FDR

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/992167670/992600638" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Emily Knowles sits outside her apartment in Watertown, Mass. Knowles has some college credits but no degree and works as a quality assurance analyst at Ovia Health, a Boston-based digital company that serves people who are starting families. "This is something that I never thought would be possible," Knowles said. Meredith Nierman/GBH News hide caption

toggle caption
Meredith Nierman/GBH News

No College, No Problem. Some Employers Drop Degree Requirements To Diversify Staffs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/990274681/992122589" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript