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Get A Comfortable Chair: Permanent Work From Home Is Coming

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An economic relief check distributed by the IRS to help with hardships caused by the coronavirus pandemic. It may take some time for the IRS to get through its backlog of work. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

With Tax Deadline Looming, IRS Faces Backlog As It Transitions Out Of COVID-19 Crisis

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Visitors to the New York Department of Labor are turned away at the door by personnel because of closures over coronavirus concerns in New York on March 18. New York state began offering job protections for those required, or cautioned, to self-isolate or quarantine by a government entity. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Liz McLemore spent weeks trying to enroll in a health plan after being laid off and losing her job-based coverage. "You just got to fight through," she says. Casey Chang hide caption

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Casey Chang

Jonathan Baird and his wife, Nichole, say they've had to decide between making their car payment and buying food since she lost her job in the pandemic. His mortgage and auto lenders told him he didn't qualify for help. Nichole Baird hide caption

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Nichole Baird

Millions Of Americans Skip Payments As Tidal Wave Of Defaults And Evictions Looms

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The pandemic and its economic fallout have made it harder for those who experience domestic violence to escape their abuser, say crisis teams, but the National Domestic Violence Hotline is one place to get quick help. Text LOVEIS to 1-866-331-9474 if speaking by phone feels too risky. Roos Koole/Getty Images hide caption

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Roos Koole/Getty Images

Domestic Abuse Can Escalate In Pandemic And Continue Even If You Get Away

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The IRS has announced that with employer approval, employees will be allowed to add, drop or alter some of their benefits — including flexible spending account contributions — for the remainder of 2020. Virojt Changyencham/Getty Images hide caption

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Virojt Changyencham/Getty Images

Career Development Coach Shares Tips On How To Look For Jobs During The Pandemic

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Census Bureau's New Survey Measures Effects Of The Pandemic On U.S. Households

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A worker passes a sign at a restaurant along San Antonio's River Walk that has reopened. As businesses reopen around the U.S., many workers are worried for their health. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Scared To Return To Work Or Can't With Kids At Home? Here's What You Need To Know

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A patient with suspected COVID-19 arrives at Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn in early April. Even as the risk of big medical bills climbs, many Americans are losing their jobs and health insurance right now. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Coronavirus Reset: How To Get Health Insurance Now

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A customer looks at trucks Friday at a Toyota dealership in El Monte, Calif. Car sales have been recovering for several weeks despite the continuing coronavirus outbreak. Mark J. Terrill/AP hide caption

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Mark J. Terrill/AP

7-Year No-Interest Loans: What It Takes To Sell Cars In A Pandemic

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