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Volunteers sort through donated clothing at a shelter in the George R. Brown Convention Center during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey on August 28 in Houston, Texas. Brendan Smialowsk/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowsk/AFP/Getty Images

Evacuees fill up cots Monday at the George Brown Convention Center in Houston, which has been turned into a shelter run by the American Red Cross to house victims of the high water from Hurricane Harvey. Experts say it's best to donate money, not items or services, to trusted charitable organizations after a disaster — and to keep long-term needs in mind. Erich Schlegel/Getty Images hide caption

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Mowing the lawn can be good exercise, and is fun for some people. But others who find themselves squeezed for time might find the luxury of paying someone else to do it to be of much more value than buying more stuff. Kristen Solecki for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Solecki for NPR

Need A Happiness Boost? Spend Your Money To Buy Time, Not More Stuff

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Ferrari race cars are lined up at dawn on Pebble Beach Golf Links' 18th green at during the 67th Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance. California's Monterey Peninsula is home to the renowned car show that displays the most exotic, rare, and the most expensive cars in the world. Bruce W. Talamon for NPR hide caption

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Bruce W. Talamon for NPR

PHOTOS: Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance Showcases Most Exotic, Rare, Expensive Cars

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An analysis by the Congressional Budget Office released Tuesday found that ending cost-sharing reduction payments to insurers, a move that President Trump is contemplating, would raise the deficit by $194 billion over 10 years. Melina Mara/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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CBO Predicts Rise In Deficit If Trump Cuts Payments To Insurance Companies

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Michelle Labra and her daughter, Daphne, live in an accessory dwelling unit (ADU) in their landlord's backyard. Portland has among the most permissive rules for ADUs in the country. Last year, the city issued building permits for about one a day. Amelia Templeton/OPB hide caption

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Amelia Templeton/OPB

'Granny Pods' Help Keep Portland Affordable

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President Trump at a listening session with health insurance executives at the White House earlier this year. Aude Guerrucci/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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A 2008 photo shows Presidio Terrace, a gated community in San Francisco. A San Jose couple bought the street — a private road — after the homeowners association failed to pay a tax bill. Dale/Flickr hide caption

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Why America's Wages Are Barely Rising

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A Wells Fargo Bank branch office in San Francisco. The bank acknowledges it signed up nearly 500,000 auto-loan customers for insurance they didn't need. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Who Snatched My Car? Wells Fargo Did

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Dow Tops 22,000, Helped By Apple Shares

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