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Many Employers Say Temporary Tax Break Is Not Worth The Trouble

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Caroline Wells and her family at their new home outside San Antonio. The builders just finished it so the yard has yet to be planted, but the couple are looking forward to letting the kids run out their energy with a lot more outdoor space than they had at their home in the city. Trisha Kosub hide caption

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Trisha Kosub

More Space, Please: Home Sales Booming Despite Pandemic, Recession

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5 (More) Ways Life Has Changed

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A Conversation With Janet Yellen

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The expanded federal unemployment benefits are gone with no extension from Congress in sight. Eviction moratoriums are expiring even as large numbers of people continue to lose jobs. And so this sudden, deep recession is forcing many people to upend their lives. Stockbyte/Getty Images hide caption

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'Will I Have A Place To Live?' Scrambling To Survive After $600 Benefits End

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Kaitlyn McCollum, pictured here in 2018, was teaching high school in Tennessee when her federal TEACH Grants were turned into more than $20,000 in loans. Stacy Kranitz for NPR hide caption

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Stacy Kranitz for NPR
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Why Do Diamonds Cost More Than Water?

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A drop-off at a day care last month in the Queens borough of New York City. Lindsey Nicholson/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Lindsey Nicholson/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Beware of scammers. Legitimate contact tracers will never ask you for any sort of payment or seek other financial information or your Social Security number. Karl Tapales/Getty Images hide caption

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Karl Tapales/Getty Images

How To Tell A Real COVID-19 Contact Tracer's Call From A Scammer's

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A sale sign is seen in front of a home in Miami. FHA loans are used by many minority, lower-income, and first-time homebuyers because the low down payments make homeownership more affordable. But this demographic is more likely to be hurt financially during the pandemic, and many FHA borrowers are skipping mortgage payments. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images