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Many Employers Say Temporary Tax Break Is Not Worth The Trouble

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Caroline Wells and her family at their new home outside San Antonio. The builders just finished it so the yard has yet to be planted, but the couple are looking forward to letting the kids run out their energy with a lot more outdoor space than they had at their home in the city. Trisha Kosub hide caption

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Trisha Kosub

More Space, Please: Home Sales Booming Despite Pandemic, Recession

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The expanded federal unemployment benefits are gone with no extension from Congress in sight. Eviction moratoriums are expiring even as large numbers of people continue to lose jobs. And so this sudden, deep recession is forcing many people to upend their lives. Stockbyte/Getty Images hide caption

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Stockbyte/Getty Images

'Will I Have A Place To Live?' Scrambling To Survive After $600 Benefits End

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Kaitlyn McCollum, pictured here in 2018, was teaching high school in Tennessee when her federal TEACH Grants were turned into more than $20,000 in loans. Stacy Kranitz for NPR hide caption

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Stacy Kranitz for NPR

A drop-off at a day care last month in the Queens borough of New York City. Lindsey Nicholson/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Lindsey Nicholson/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Beware of scammers. Legitimate contact tracers will never ask you for any sort of payment or seek other financial information or your Social Security number. Karl Tapales/Getty Images hide caption

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Karl Tapales/Getty Images

How To Tell A Real COVID-19 Contact Tracer's Call From A Scammer's

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A sale sign is seen in front of a home in Miami. FHA loans are used by many minority, lower-income, and first-time homebuyers because the low down payments make homeownership more affordable. But this demographic is more likely to be hurt financially during the pandemic, and many FHA borrowers are skipping mortgage payments. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Lisa Vrooman with her boyfriend John Rock, dog Umar and cat Mochi. They love the high ceilings in their 650-square-foot apartment, but keeping it cool is costly. Lisa Vrooman hide caption

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Lisa Vrooman

Pandemic Electric Bills Are Searing Hot, As Families Stay Home

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The Federal Reserve has helped push interest rates to record lows, which allows millions to consider refinancing. But a new fee from Fannie and Freddie could introduce an obstacle, critics say. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Want To Refinance Your Home Loan With Record Low Rates? Get Ready For A Hefty Fee

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California Assembly member Monique Limón (foreground) introduced a bill to create a financial watchdog agency for the state. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

New California Financial Watchdog Would Take Aim At Predatory Lenders Amid Pandemic

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Stock trading has become easier and cheaper than ever. But have venues like Robinhood made it too risky for inexperienced investors? Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Millions Turn To Stock Trading During Pandemic, But Some See Trouble For The Young

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Staff at the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores turned off a 30-foot waterfall and collected all the coins visitors had thrown into the water to make wishes. After cleaning the money, they'll put it toward the aquarium's expenses. Liz Baird/Courtesy of North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores hide caption

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Liz Baird/Courtesy of North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores

Aquarium Is Washing Old Wishes To Pay Bills During Pandemic

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Stimulus checks are prepared on May 8, 2008, in Philadelphia. In 2020, stimulus checks again went to many Americans, this time during the pandemic's economic fallout. Some of that money went to thousands of foreign workers not eligible to receive the funds. Jeff Fusco/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Fusco/Getty Images

Foreign Workers Living Overseas Mistakenly Received $1,200 U.S. Stimulus Checks

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