Your Money NPR coverage of personal finance, money, investing, taxes, retirement, mortgages and housing markets, wealth management, and stock market news. Download NPR podcasts and RSS feeds.

Travis Warner of Dallas got tested for the coronavirus at a free-standing emergency room in June 2020 after one of his colleagues tested positive for the virus. The emergency room bill included a $54,000 charge for one test. Laura Buckman for KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Laura Buckman for KHN

The Bill For His COVID Test In Texas Was A Whopping $54,000

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1039788368/1042008594" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A supporter of pop star Britney Spears participating in a #FreeBritney rally on July 14 in Washington, D.C. When anyone poses a high risk of harm to themselves or others, psychiatrists are obligated to hospitalize them, even against their will. For many patients, paying for that involuntary care leads to long-term financial strain. Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Spinning on the hamster wheel allows Mr. Goxx to select a cryptocurrency to trade. Choosing one of two tunnels to run through allows him to buy or sell. YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

A community of young investors on TikTok, including @ceowatchlist, @quicktrades and @irisapp, are using House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's stock trading disclosures as inspiration for where to invest themselves. One user called Pelosi the market's "biggest whale," while another called her the "queen of investing." @ceowatchlist; @quicktrades; @irisapp/TikTok hide caption

toggle caption
@ceowatchlist; @quicktrades; @irisapp/TikTok

TikTokers Are Trading Stocks By Copying What Members Of Congress Do

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1039313011/1039393909" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Homeownership is the most common way Americans build wealth over their lifetimes. Amanda Voisard for The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Amanda Voisard for The Washington Post via Getty Images

A New Housing Regulator Could Make The American Dream More Accessible For Millions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1038353689/1038448354" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Mat Pergens just wants "four walls and a roof that I can afford" for himself, his wife, his 6-year-old daughter and his baby on the way. But even that modest of a dream is out of reach these days. Zac Visco for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Zac Visco for NPR

The Housing Shortage Is Significant. It's Acute For Small, Entry-Level Homes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1033585422/1035471178" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Commuters wait in line for public buses as they leave work in Beijing's business district on Aug. 27. China's Supreme People's Court has ruled that it's illegal for companies to subject employees to the practice known as "996," or working 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. six days a week. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

Ely Bair had two medically necessary jaw surgeries. For the first, in 2018, his share of the bill was $3,000. For the second, in 2019 after a job change, he was billed $27,000, even though he had the same insurance carrier. Jovelle Tamayo for Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Jovelle Tamayo for Kaiser Health News

Same Hospital And Insurer, But The Bill For His 2nd Jaw Procedure Was $24,000 More

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1030280972/1032340360" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Norma Jasso, 62, sped up retirement plans after her daughter asked for help with a new baby. She stands with a highchair her father had commissioned from a shop in Sinaloa, Mexico. Her daughters used it and now her grandson will too. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Andrea Hsu/NPR

These Older Workers Hadn't Planned To Retire So Soon. The Pandemic Sped Things Up

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1028993124/1030223470" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Students applaud at the Morehouse College commencement ceremony on May 16, 2021, in Atlanta. Morehouse recently announced it would clear remaining tuition balances for students, joining several other HBCUs doing the same. Marcus Ingram/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Marcus Ingram/Getty Images

Illustration of a person standing in front of a life-sized chart showing different colors in waves and lines representing them balancing their stock portfolio. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
LA Johnson/NPR

New To Investing? Here Are Some Common Mistakes To Avoid And Tips To Follow

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1022200011/1022209481" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">