The Tulsa Race Massacre On May 31, 1921, a white mob destroyed Tulsa's Black Wall Street and killed hundreds of people.
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The Tulsa Race Massacre

A woman cries out on May 31 while attending a candlelight vigil in the Greenwood district during commemorations of the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre in Tulsa, Okla. President Biden visited Tulsa on Tuesday for the 100th anniversary of an attack that left as many as 300 people dead. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

John Rogers, co-CEO of Ariel Investments, stands for a Bloomberg Television spot in Atlantic City, N.J., July 22, 2013. Rogers tells NPR about the emotional and financial impact the Tulsa riots had on his family. Scott Eells/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Eells/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How Tulsa Race Massacre Shaped Today's Most Successful Black CEOs

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Artist Paul Rucker is creating a new multimedia work to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre. That's when a thriving African American community was destroyed in a horrific act of violence that wiped out hundreds of Black-owned businesses and homes. Above, an aerial view of Tulsa, Okla., Fowler & Kelly, 1918. GHI/Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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GHI/Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Artist's Black Wall Street Project Is About Tulsa 100 Years Ago — And Today

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"Little Africa on fire, Tulsa Race Riot, June 1, 1921" University of Tulsa/McFarlin Library Special Collections hide caption

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University of Tulsa/McFarlin Library Special Collections

3 Documentaries You Should Watch About The Tulsa Race Massacre

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They sought talent that fit the mindset of Black Wall Street — musicians who could set aside ego to commemorate their ancestors. Ryan Cash/Fivvish/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Ryan Cash/Fivvish/Courtesy of the artist

Buildings were destroyed in a massive fire during the Tulsa Race Massacre when a white mob attacked the Greenwood neighborhood, a prosperous Black community in Tulsa, Okla., in 1921. Eyewitnesses recalled the specter of men carrying torches through the streets to set fire to homes and businesses. Library of Congress hide caption

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Library of Congress

A Century After The Race Massacre, Tulsa Confronts Its Bloody Past

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Viola Fletcher, the oldest living survivor of the Tulsa Race Massacre, tells a congressional hearing: "I have lived through the massacre every day. Our country may forget this history, but I cannot." Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Survivors Of 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Share Eyewitness Accounts

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