The Week's Best Stories From NPR Books This week: Meg Wolitzer's latest, Charles Frazier returns to the Civil War, the pressures of being the only black person in the room, a new Macbeth, and marriage-saving tips from a divorce lawyer.
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The Week's Best Stories From NPR Books

This week: Meg Wolitzer, Charles Frazier, Jo Nesbo, Nafissa Thompson-Spires and James Sexton.

Laura Ingalls Wilder entertained generations of children with her Little House series, which was loosely based on her family's pioneering life. Her memoir, Pioneer Girl, was published in 2014. South Dakota State Historical Society hide caption

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South Dakota State Historical Society

'Little House,' Big Demand: Never Underestimate Laura Ingalls Wilder

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Marie Mutsuki Mockett says the Japanese tradition of Tōrō nagashi — lighting floating paper lanterns in honor of loved ones — reminded her that she was not alone in her grief. Alberto Carrasco Casado/Flickr hide caption

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Alberto Carrasco Casado/Flickr

After Father's Death, A Writer Learns How 'The Japanese Say Goodbye'

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Atria Books

In 'Dear Father,' A Poet Disrupts The 'Cycle Of Pain'

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Frank Sinatra captured by photographer William "PoPsie" Randolph during a 1943 concert. Author Ben Yagoda points to Sinatra as one of the interpreters who helped revive the Great American Songbook. William "PoPsie" Randolph/Courtesy of Riverhead hide caption

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William "PoPsie" Randolph/Courtesy of Riverhead

When Pop Broke Up With Jazz

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Written during the Soviet era, Mikhail Bulgakov's classic novel, The Master and Margarita, continues to resonate in today's Russia. Sovfoto/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Sovfoto/UIG via Getty Images

Bulgakov's 'Master' Still Strikes A Chord In Today's Russia

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Book Club: Hector Tobar Answers Your Questions About 'Deep Down Dark'

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Allen Kurzweil's previous books include The Grand Complication and A Case of Curiosities. Ferrante Ferranti hide caption

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Ferrante Ferranti

Finding A Childhood Bully, And So Much More, In 'Whipping Boy'

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Illustrated Memoir Recalls Marching In Selma At Just 15

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This Weekend, Visit San Francisco's Famed Forbidden City In 'China Dolls'

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