The Week's Best Stories From NPR Books This week: Matt de la Peña on his new picture book. The fearless cook who fed and funded civil rights activists. Plus poet Kaveh Akbar, Leila Slimani and a new feminist dystopia set in in Oregon.
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Experts Or Censors? The Debate Over Authors' Use Of Sensitivity Readers

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Penguin Random House

'The Poky Little Puppy' And His Fellow Little Golden Books Are Turning 75

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My Favorite Thing Is Monsters explores the theme of "monstrousness" from various angles. Fantagraphics hide caption

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Fantagraphics

'My Favorite Thing Is Monsters' Is A Dazzling, Graphic Novel Tour-De-Force

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An illustration from 1875 depicts the survivors of the frigate Cospatrick, which caught fire off South Africa's Cape of Good Hope in November 1874. Of more than 470 people on board, just three ultimately survived, and they were reduced to cannibalism. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

In 1852 — three years before Leaves of Grass — Walt Whitman anonymously published a short novel, in six parts, in New York's Sunday Dispatch. FPG/Getty Images hide caption

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FPG/Getty Images

Grad Student Discovers A Lost Novel Written By Walt Whitman

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Gary Cooper plays the sheriff in the 1952 film High Noon. Author Glenn Frankel says the film can be viewed as a parable for the Hollywood blacklist era. Associated Press hide caption

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Associated Press

What A Classic '50s Western Can Teach Us About The Hollywood Blacklist

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Freda DeKnight was Ebony's first food editor and author of a best-selling African-American cookbook in the 1940s. Her recipes presented a vision of black America that was often invisible in mainstream media. Sierra Nicole Rhoden/Chicago Tribune hide caption

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Sierra Nicole Rhoden/Chicago Tribune
Marian Carrasquero/NPR

'Lincoln In The Bardo' Pictures An American Saint Of Sorrow

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