The Week's Best Stories From NPR Books This week: Meg Wolitzer's latest, Charles Frazier returns to the Civil War, the pressures of being the only black person in the room, a new Macbeth, and marriage-saving tips from a divorce lawyer.
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The Week's Best Stories From NPR Books

This week: Meg Wolitzer, Charles Frazier, Jo Nesbo, Nafissa Thompson-Spires and James Sexton.

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'Publicly Shamed:' Who Needs The Pillory When We've Got Twitter?

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Actor Mark Rylance, seen here as Thomas Cromwell in Masterpiece's Wolf Hall, views Cromwell as a survivor who knows how to manipulate power to his advantage. "He has the mind of a chess player," Rylance says. Giles Keyte/Playground & Company Pictures for Masterpiece/BBC hide caption

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Giles Keyte/Playground & Company Pictures for Masterpiece/BBC

'Wolf Hall' On Stage And TV Means More Makeovers For Henry VIII's 'Pit Bull'

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How 'One Nation' Didn't Become 'Under God' Until The '50s Religious Revival

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John Hargrove, a trainer who spent 14 years working with orcas, mostly at SeaWorld, eventually became disillusioned with the company's treatment of its killer whales. Courtesy of Palgrave Macmillan Trade hide caption

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Courtesy of Palgrave Macmillan Trade

Former Orca Trainer For SeaWorld Condemns Its Practices

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Thanks To Chance (And Craigslist), A Writer Becomes A Carpenter

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'Hausfrau' Strips Down Its Modern-Day Madame Bovary

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Pop Culture Happy Hour: Nick Hornby's 'Funny Girl' And Adapting Books

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Models show designs by Oscar de la Renta at the 1973 Versailles show. De la Renta was one of the first American designers to sign on for the catwalk competition. Daniel Simon/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Simon/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

How A 1970s Fashion Faceoff Put American Designers In The Spotlight

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The empty frame from which thieves cut Rembrandt's The Storm on the Sea of Galilee remains on display at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. The painting was one of 13 works stolen from the museum in 1990. Josh Reynolds/AP hide caption

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Josh Reynolds/AP

25 Years After Art Heist, Empty Frames Still Hang In Boston's Gardner Museum

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Mai Tai Sing dances with her husband, Wilbur Tai Sing, in 1942. Courtesy DeepFocus Productions Inc. hide caption

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Courtesy DeepFocus Productions Inc.

These Nightclub Entertainers Paved The Way For Asian-Americans In Showbiz

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Terry Pratchett wrote more than 70 books. Rob Wilkins/Courtesy of Doubleday hide caption

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Rob Wilkins/Courtesy of Doubleday

Author Terry Pratchett Was No Stranger To Death

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