The Week's Best Stories From NPR Books This week: Meg Wolitzer's latest, Charles Frazier returns to the Civil War, the pressures of being the only black person in the room, a new Macbeth, and marriage-saving tips from a divorce lawyer.
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The Week's Best Stories From NPR Books

This week: Meg Wolitzer, Charles Frazier, Jo Nesbo, Nafissa Thompson-Spires and James Sexton.
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How For-Profit Colleges Sell 'Risky Education' To The Most Vulnerable

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Emma Donoghue Helps Kids Deal With Dementia (And Still Has Fun) In 'The Lotterys'

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In 1957, Duncan Hines and his wife, Clara, cut a cake at the Duncan Hines test kitchen in Ithaca, N.Y. Courtesy of Department of Special Collections-WKU hide caption

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Courtesy of Department of Special Collections-WKU

Atole de elote is a warm corn drink from Central America. Student Jose Rivas wrote an essay about a weekly tradition of enjoying atole with his late father in El Salvador, and how the drink helped him to feel more at home after he moved to the U.S. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan/NPR

'Ghosts' In The Arctic: How The Long-Lost Franklin Expedition Was Found

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Father Of 2 Sons With Schizophrenia Talks Of His Struggle To Save Them

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Anyone who has read or seen Victor Hugo's masterpiece knows the plot of Les Miserables turns on the theft of a simple loaf of bread. There was no sharper barometer of economic status in 19th-century France than bread. Minnie Phan for NPR hide caption

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Minnie Phan for NPR

In an image from the first Foxfire book, students in 1969 look on as Hobe Beasley, John Hopper and Hopper's wife suspend a hog for finishing the work of scalding and scraping. Courtesy of The Foxfire Fund, Inc. hide caption

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Courtesy of The Foxfire Fund, Inc.

Poet and playwright Derek Walcott published his first poem at the age of 14. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1992. Brooks Kraft/Sygma via Getty Images hide caption

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Brooks Kraft/Sygma via Getty Images

Derek Walcott, Who Wrote Of Caribbean Beauty And Bondage, Dies At 87

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Chicago author Amy Krouse Rosenthal has died at 51, according to The Associated Press. Kevin Nance/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Nance/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images

From 1997: Amy Krouse Rosenthal On What She's Thankful For

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Marin's family started calling him Cheech when he was a baby. His real name is Richard. Frazer Harrison/Getty Images for Spike TV hide caption

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Frazer Harrison/Getty Images for Spike TV

Cheech Marin On How His Famed Comic Collaboration Was Like Chicano Art

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La Belle Limonadiere, hand coloured etching (1816). Lemonade was ubiquitous in mid-17th century Paris. Where the limonadiers went, piles of spent lemon peels followed. As rats nibbled on the peels, they killed off plague-infected fleas, Tom Nealon argues in his new book. Courtesy of The British Library Board/The Overlook Press hide caption

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Courtesy of The British Library Board/The Overlook Press

Amy Dickinson is also the author of The Mighty Queens of Freeville: A Mother, a Daughter, and the Town That Raised Them. Dede Hatch/Hachette Books hide caption

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Dede Hatch/Hachette Books

In 'Strangers Tend To Tell Me Things,' An Advice Columnist Comes Home

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