The Week's Best Stories From NPR Books This week: Meg Wolitzer's latest, Charles Frazier returns to the Civil War, the pressures of being the only black person in the room, a new Macbeth, and marriage-saving tips from a divorce lawyer.
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The Week's Best Stories From NPR Books

This week: Meg Wolitzer, Charles Frazier, Jo Nesbo, Nafissa Thompson-Spires and James Sexton.
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From Medical Maggots To Stench Soup, 'Grunt' Explores The Science Of Warfare

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Parenting Pitfalls: Renegades, Privilege And Putting On The Boxing Gloves

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Claire Harbage

'Sweetbitter' Is A Savory Saga Of Restaurant Life And Love

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Eddie Huang is a chef and restaurateur, a TV host and the author of two memoirs. Donald Traill/Invision/AP hide caption

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Donald Traill/Invision/AP

Chef Eddie Huang On Cultural Identity And 'Intestine Sticky Rice Hot Dog'

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Moby's new memoir, Porcelain, is a tale of dance clubs, DJs, and New York City in the 1990s. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

In 'Porcelain,' Moby Searches For Validation And Finds Unlikely Success

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Emily Bogle/NPR

Filipino Americans: Blending Cultures, Redefining Race

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Joe Hill On 'Fireman,' Family And ... Fart Cookies?

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Emily Bogle/NPR

Who Was Joe Gould, And Did He Really Write The World's Longest Book?

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The Power Of Genes, And The Line Between Biology And Destiny

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"King of Sting" Justin O. Schmidt is a biologist at the Southwestern Biological Institute. A "connoisseur of pain," he has ranked 83 different insect stings on a pain index based on his own experience. Courtesy of Justin Schmidt hide caption

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Courtesy of Justin Schmidt

Stung By 83 Different Insects, Biologist Rates His Pain On A Scale Of 1 To — OW!

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Quail in dandelion's nest — one of Pascal Baudar's wild-crafted culinary creations. "So many wild plants, so little time," says Baudar. He leads foraging expeditions in the forests of Los Angeles and works with chefs to create meals based on wild foods. Courtesy of Pascal Baudar hide caption

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Courtesy of Pascal Baudar

Urban Foraging: Unearthing The Wildcrafted Flavors Of Los Angeles

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Thomas Thwaites says his exoskeleton was meant to help him feel like a goat, as opposed to helping him look like one. Tim Bowditch/Courtesy of Princeton Architectural Press hide caption

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Tim Bowditch/Courtesy of Princeton Architectural Press

When Being Human Got His Goat, This Designer Became One

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