The Week's Best Stories From NPR Books This week: Meg Wolitzer's latest, Charles Frazier returns to the Civil War, the pressures of being the only black person in the room, a new Macbeth, and marriage-saving tips from a divorce lawyer.
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The Week's Best Stories From NPR Books

This week: Meg Wolitzer, Charles Frazier, Jo Nesbo, Nafissa Thompson-Spires and James Sexton.

Pilgrims leaving Canterbury, from text of the end of the Prologue to The Canterbury Tales, by Geoffrey Chaucer. British Library/The Art Archive hide caption

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British Library/The Art Archive

This Weekend, 'Caminar' Navigates Horrors With Poetry

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A group of dads from Project Fatherhood join author Jorja Leap to celebrate the publication of her book, Project Fatherhood: A Story of Courage and Healing in One of America's Toughest Communities. Todd Cheney/Courtesy of UCLA Photography hide caption

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Todd Cheney/Courtesy of UCLA Photography

'Project Fatherhood': In A Struggling Neighborhood, Dads Are Helping Dads

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From Civilian To Spy: How An Average Guy Helped Bust A Russian Agent

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Survival Is Insufficient: 'Station Eleven' Preserves Art After The Apocalypse

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Pages bookstore partner and manager Samer al-Kadri (center) talks with customers. The Syrian founded a publishing company in Damascus, but fled when the war made it impossible to run. He wound up in Istanbul, where he noticed a lack of books in Arabic, and took it upon himself to serve the community. Peter Kenyon/NPR hide caption

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Peter Kenyon/NPR

Istanbul Bookstore Caters To Syrian Refugees In Need Of A Good Read

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Kate Atkinson says she never sees her characters at just one stage of their lives. Just as we are constantly thinking about the past, present and future in real life, she constructs her characters in the same way. Euan Myles/Courtesy Hachette Book Group hide caption

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Euan Myles/Courtesy Hachette Book Group

Kate Atkinson Tells Book Club How She Crafts Characters At All Life Stages

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Lawrence Ferlinghetti, pictured here in 2004, was the principal publisher of the writers and poets known as the Beat Generation. Gezett/ullstein bild via Getty Images hide caption

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Gezett/ullstein bild via Getty Images

At 96, Poet And Beat Publisher Lawrence Ferlinghetti Isn't Done Yet

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Juan Felipe Herrera won the National Book Critics Circle Award in 2008 for his collection Half of the World in Light. Courtesy of Blue Flower Arts hide caption

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Courtesy of Blue Flower Arts

Juan Felipe Herrera Named U.S. Poet Laureate

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Fallon's new book has a daddy bee, dog, rabbit, cat and donkey (one of his personal favorites) all trying — and failing — to get their babies to say "dada." Macmillan Children's Publishing Group hide caption

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Macmillan Children's Publishing Group

If Jimmy Fallon Gets His Way, 'Your Baby's First Word Will Be Dada'

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

A New Judy Blume Novel For Adults Is Always An 'Event'

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