The Week's Best Stories From NPR Books This week: Joe Biden's wrenching memoir. Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Maria Tatar talk African American folk tales. Joe Ide's Los Angeles, Lord of the Rings prequels and Andy Weir's new space adventure.

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Grotesque Horror Through A Kid-Sized Window

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Former New Yorker staff writer Jonah Lehrer is the author of Imagine: How Creativity Works. Nina Subin/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt hide caption

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Nina Subin/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

'The Lies Are Over': A Journalist Unravels

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Laura Florand's new novel concerns a romance between a French chocolatier and an American candy-bar magnate. Nikki deGroot/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Nikki deGroot/iStockphoto.com

Writer Karin Slaughter has seen the fallout of some of Atlanta's most gruesome crimes and most dramatic transitions. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Writer Has A Down-Home Feel For Atlanta's Dark Side

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Simon and Schuster

'In The Attic': Whips, Witches And A Peculiar Princess

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A Little Advice On 'How To Be A Woman'

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In 2001, Sally Koslow's then 25-year-old son moved back home after graduating from college. Jim Tierney hide caption

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Jim Tierney

Laying Down New Rules For The 'Not-So-Empty Nest'

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