The Week's Best Stories From NPR Books This week: Meg Wolitzer's latest, Charles Frazier returns to the Civil War, the pressures of being the only black person in the room, a new Macbeth, and marriage-saving tips from a divorce lawyer.

Alan Cheuse was our guide to the best and worst of the written word for more than 30 years. Josh Cheuse hide caption

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Josh Cheuse

Remembering Alan Cheuse, Our Longtime Literary Guide

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George Brett wipes a new bat down with a pine tar rag before a game with the Cleveland Indians on July 25, 1983. The day before, Brett had been called out for using a bat with pine tar too far down the bat; the league president decided that Brett's bat was OK. Doug Atkins/AP hide caption

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Doug Atkins/AP

A Rage For The Ages: The Unforgettable 'Pine Tar Game'

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Lea and Bandy met in 1976 at a high school dance. "He was the boy from out of town," Lea writes. "I was the girl who wanted out." John Carswell/Courtesy of the author hide caption

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John Carswell/Courtesy of the author

In 'Wondering Who You Are,' A Man Wakes Up And Doesn't Know His Wife

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Author and activist Bill McKibben paddles toward Follensby Pond in New York's Adirondack Mountains, along the route followed by Ralph Waldo Emerson in the summer of 1858. Julia Ferguson/NCPR hide caption

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Julia Ferguson/NCPR

Retracing Ralph Waldo Emerson's Steps In A Now 'Unchanged Eden'

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In 2013, residents of some towns in western Mexico took up arms in an effort to defend their villages against drug gangs. Marco Ugarte/AP hide caption

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Marco Ugarte/AP

'Cartel' Author Spins A Grand Tale Of Mexico's Drug Wars

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A Lane cake is a layered sponge cake filled with a rich mixture of egg yolks, butter, sugar, raisins and whiskey and topped with boiled icing. Nadia Chaudhury for NPR hide caption

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Nadia Chaudhury for NPR

Ta-Nehisi Coates is national correspondent for The Atlantic. He is also the author of The Beautiful Struggle. Nina Subin/Random House hide caption

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Nina Subin/Random House

Ta-Nehisi Coates On Police Brutality, The Confederate Flag And Forgiveness

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Marcel Proust Omikron Omikron/Photo Researchers RM/Getty Images hide caption

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Omikron Omikron/Photo Researchers RM/Getty Images

French, English, Comics: Proust On Memory, In Any Language

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Harper Lee's friend Michael Brown took this picture of the author in October 1957, the same month she signed with publisher J.B. Lippincott. Michael Brown/Courtesy of Columbia University hide caption

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Michael Brown/Courtesy of Columbia University

How Harper Lee Went From Wannabe Writer To The Jane Austen Of Alabama

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Pilgrims leaving Canterbury, from text of the end of the Prologue to The Canterbury Tales, by Geoffrey Chaucer. British Library/The Art Archive hide caption

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British Library/The Art Archive

This Weekend, 'Caminar' Navigates Horrors With Poetry

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A group of dads from Project Fatherhood join author Jorja Leap to celebrate the publication of her book, Project Fatherhood: A Story of Courage and Healing in One of America's Toughest Communities. Todd Cheney/Courtesy of UCLA Photography hide caption

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Todd Cheney/Courtesy of UCLA Photography

'Project Fatherhood': In A Struggling Neighborhood, Dads Are Helping Dads

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From Civilian To Spy: How An Average Guy Helped Bust A Russian Agent

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